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Credit Report – Check Your Credit Rating or Score Today, the three credit reporting agencies.#The #three #credit #reporting #agencies

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Do you know what your credit score is? Find out your credit rating and keep track of any changes to it. Not only will this improve your chances of being accepted for a credit card or loan, but you ll also be able to spot any suspicious activity on your credit file.

The three credit reporting agencies

Credit Reports, Monitoring & Identity Theft Protection

    • Provider/Product name The three credit reporting agencies

Experian CreditExpert

£14.99 per month

Unlimited access to your Experian Credit Score and credit report

Expert advice to help improve your Experian credit score

The UK’s most trusted Credit Score (Source: ICMUnlimited survey, July 2016)

Access to an award-winning UK Customer Contact Centre and dedicated Victim of Fraud Team

Equifax

£14.95 per month

– 30 day FREE trial

– Unlimited, easy online access to your latest Equifax Credit Report Score

– Identity protection Be alerted if we find your details are shared on websites used by fraudsters

– Telephone support 8am 8pm daily (except 25th 26th December)

– Online help and dispute resolution

Credit Angel

£14.99 per month

Easy to use site with unlimited FREE access to your credit score and report for 30 days

See how your social media activity can affect your ability to gain credit

Credit and Fraud alerts

Tailored finance deals, savings and vouchers

Comprehensive support from Credit Angel’s expert Customer Care Team

Credit report

You can boost your chances of being accepted for a credit card or loan by finding out your credit score first. Knowledge is power, so being in the know by being party to the same information as the lender, will place you in a much stronger position.

Are you aware of what sort of information is held on your credit file? Unless you regularly check your file, the chances are you don t know, but finding out can help you work out the best ways to improve your rating.

The information held on your credit file helps lenders to decide whether or not they will accept your credit card, mortgage, loan or even mobile phone contract application.

If you know you ve made a few financial slip ups in the past and your credit score could be better, or you ve never borrowed and so haven t yet built up a credit history in the first place, there are steps you can take to improve your rating so you are more likely to be accepted if you want to take out a loan or apply for a credit card.

Are you on the electoral roll?

If you have registered to vote, then you should already be on the electoral roll at your current address. The electoral roll is used by many companies to check you are who you say you are, so they can ensure someone else isn t using your identity fraudulently to make credit applications in your name. If you’re not registered on the electoral roll, you ll need to get in touch with your local council and request a registration form, or alternatively you can register online.

Are you already a borrower?

It might sound odd, but if you ve never borrowed money before, lenders are likely to see this as a negative. They want to know that you can manage your money responsibly, and if you have never borrowed, this cannot be demonstrated. If you haven t ever had a credit card or loan, it may therefore be worth opening an account in order to create a credit history but make sure you repay what you owe and on time, otherwise you could end up with a black mark on your credit file.

Check your credit rating

Are you certain that the information held about you is absolutely right? It is worth checking your file to make sure that it does not contain details that are wrong and could restrict your chances of being accepted credit. You can get a copy of your credit report at our credit monitoring service. And if you find any inaccuracies you can apply to the relevant agency to get them changed.

County Court Judgments (CCJs)

If you’ve had a County Court Judgement against you which has now been settled, make sure this is recorded on your credit file, as having one which hasn t yet been settled can have a very negative impact on your credit rating. If your CCJ isn t showing up as being settled, ask the court to provide confirmation details and pass these on to the credit rating agencies.

Don t make repeated applications

If you are turned down for credit, don t be tempted to make lots of other applications elsewhere. These will leave a footprint on your credit file which could work against you as lenders might think you are desperate to borrow money, or that you are victim of identity fraud. Before making any credit application, get hold of a copy of your report so you know how strong your credit rating is, and only make applications for deals you are confident you will be accepted for.

Change of circumstances

If your personal situation has changed, for example, you ve got divorced or lost your job, and you are finding it difficult to make ends meet, you must let lenders know as soon as possible. You can put a Notice of Correction on your credit file explaining why you might have missed any payments. Lenders should take this into consideration when you make a credit application, particularly if you are able to show you have subsequently got back on track financially.

Keep borrowing in check

Don t max out your credit card. If you owe money on your card, you should try and ensure it isn t more than a third of your overall credit limit. If you often own much more than this, then lenders might start to worry about lending you any more money as they will be concerned you might not be able to keep up with repayments.

Pay on time

Make sure payments go out on time by setting up direct debits and standing orders wherever possible. It’s easy to forget a payment so setting up direct debits and standing orders with your bank will ensure payments go out on time. This will also ensure you won t be stung by any penalty charges or fees for paying late, which could have a negative impact on your credit rating.

Shut down credit accounts you no longer use

If you ve got credit cards or other credit accounts which you don t need any more, shut them down as soon as possible. When lenders look at your credit file, they focus on the total amount of credit available to you, as opposed to the amount you actually owe, so having lots of open accounts could reduce your credit rating.

Pay on time

Missing or late loan or credit card repayments will work against you and leave a black mark on your credit file. Make sure you always pay on time as this will show lenders that you are good at managing your money.

Other factors which can have an impact

As well as looking carefully at your credit history, when you apply for credit lenders will also want to check how long you have been a UK resident. If you have only recently moved here, you may have to wait at least three months before you apply for a credit card. You may also have to show proof of your income and provide evidence of employment.

How our site works

We want to show you as many credit reporting companies as possible, so you can choose the one that suits you best. We can t promise to show you every single company, because some don t want to be included on comparison websites. We ve ranked the companies according to the fee they pay us, from highest to lowest. This doesn t necessarily mean that the company at the top of the list is the best one for you make sure you compare them to find the one that suits you best. You can find out more about how we work here.





Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card to have.#What #is #the #best #credit #card #to #have

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Learn how the right credit card can become a power financial tool, from paying off debt faster to earning rewards and perks.

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What is the best credit card to have

Business Platinum Card from American Express vs. Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express

Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on the website are from companies from which this site receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this [. ]

What is the best credit card to have

U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

What is the best credit card to have

Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

What is the best credit card to have

Current Credit Card Interest Rates

View current credit card rates based on Bankrate.com’s weekly national survey of large banks and thrifts.

What is the best credit card to have

Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

Your annual credit card spending will determine which of these rewards cards is right for you.

What is the best credit card to have

Black Friday 2017: Find the best credit card strategy for you

Using the right card can help you maximize rewards and save money while holiday shopping.

What is the best credit card to have

6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

There are ways you can prevent a card closing, but sometimes it’s out of your control.

What is the best credit card to have

Uber’s new rewards credit card zooms ahead of the pack

You may be floored by the souped-up rewards on dining and travel spending.

What is the best credit card to have

Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

What is the best credit card to have

Best credit card tips for November 2017

These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

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Maximize Your Money. Get Expert Advice Tools. Master Life’s Financial Journey.

You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for four decades.

Our tools, rates and advice help no matter where you are on life’s financial journey.

How we make money

Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.

2017 Bankrate, LLC All Rights Reserved.





Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card to have.#What #is #the #best #credit #card #to #have

Credit Cards

Learn how the right credit card can become a power financial tool, from paying off debt faster to earning rewards and perks.

What would you like to do?

Credit Card Offers

Payoff Calculator

Credit Card Reviews

Minimum Payment Calculator

Editor’s Picks

What is the best credit card to have

Why 0% financing from retailers can be a bad deal

What is the best credit card to have

Should you use a balance transfer credit card to pay down debt?

What is the best credit card to have

4 tips to maximize your rewards credit cards

What is the best credit card to have

6 risky ways to pay off credit card debt

What is the best credit card to have

What credit score do you need for a premium rewards credit card?

Latest Articles

What is the best credit card to have

Business Platinum Card from American Express vs. Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express

Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on the website are from companies from which this site receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this [. ]

What is the best credit card to have

U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

What is the best credit card to have

Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

What is the best credit card to have

Current Credit Card Interest Rates

View current credit card rates based on Bankrate.com’s weekly national survey of large banks and thrifts.

What is the best credit card to have

Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

Your annual credit card spending will determine which of these rewards cards is right for you.

What is the best credit card to have

Black Friday 2017: Find the best credit card strategy for you

Using the right card can help you maximize rewards and save money while holiday shopping.

What is the best credit card to have

6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

There are ways you can prevent a card closing, but sometimes it’s out of your control.

What is the best credit card to have

Uber’s new rewards credit card zooms ahead of the pack

You may be floored by the souped-up rewards on dining and travel spending.

What is the best credit card to have

Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

What is the best credit card to have

Best credit card tips for November 2017

These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

RELATED TOPICS

HELPFUL LINKS

Maximize Your Money. Get Expert Advice Tools. Master Life’s Financial Journey.

You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for four decades.

Our tools, rates and advice help no matter where you are on life’s financial journey.

How we make money

Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.

2017 Bankrate, LLC All Rights Reserved.





Credit Cards – Compare Best Card Offers & Apply Online, Bankrate, what is the best credit card to have.#What #is #the #best #credit #card #to #have

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What is the best credit card to have

When looking to get a credit card, there are a variety of things you should consider. If you want a rewards card to use frequently, you might not mind paying a $100 or $200 annual fee. You should also consider the regular APR (as opposed to the introductory rate) and the interest rate. A good interest rate is dependent on how you will use the card. For example, a 20% interest rate is fine if you plan on paying off the balance every month.

It pays to ask these kinds of questions before you fill out the application form. Here are 9 questions you want answered before you sign on the dotted line.

The “very first question” the consumer should ask is, “Why am I applying for this card? Why do I need this card?” says Bruce McClary, media director for ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling

Some positive reasons: The card has low or no fees, a lower interest rate or offers a rewards program that suits your spending habits. “It has to make sense, and it has to fit into your overall lifestyle,” McClary says.

Do you pay off your credit card balances every month? If so, “you don’t care what the interest rate is because you won’t pay any,” says Ric Edelman, author of “The Truth About Money.” “But you care about the (annual) fee,” he says.

If you run a balance, you want the lowest rate you can get, even if that comes with an annual fee.

One clue to your usage: “Look at your past history,” says Edelman. “Because what you’ve done before is what you will be doing.”

If you’re shopping for a card, chances are you’re comparing card terms. But if an issuer sends you an offer, it’s tempting to apply and see what you get.

“It’s really difficult to pick one (in isolation),” says Kelly Rogers, chief development officer for the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County and adjunct faculty at Chapman University. “If someone just shows you one car, how do you know if it’s the right car for you?”

Her advice: Do a side-by-side comparison of several different cards before you apply.

Don’t be afraid to plug the card name, “complaints” and “customer service” into your favorite search engine. “I go through and see who has the least amount of complaints and issues,” says Rogers.

Some cards will give you a range of rates you could get, but often that window is pretty wide, says Nick Bourke, director of the Safe Credit Card Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Other cards may offer a specific rate (or terms) and either approve or reject you.

If you’re operating totally in the dark, you have another option: Apply by phone and push for an answer on your rate and credit line before the account is opened.

While there are no guarantees, sometimes you can get an answer, says Bourke.

“I’ve actually done this myself,” he says, admitting “you do have to go pretty far in the process.”

You may have to ask for the department that’s actually evaluating your application to get an answer, he says.

“The thing that you want to do is when you’re talking to the person on the phone taking your application is you want to push them as hard as you can to get your APR and credit line,” Bourke says. Then, once you have the information and before the account is opened in your name, “you can say yes or no at that point,” he says.

According to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, if a card offers a lower interest rate during an introductory period, the promotional rate has to last at least six months. While that introductory offer may be appealing, the regular rate is what you’re really buying.

So find out when the introductory APR expires and what the new rate will be. You can find this information online in the terms and conditions for the card or you can ask a service representative.

Another smart question: How long is that grace period? “Some cards start charging interest immediately,” says Edelman. A card can have different grace periods for balance transfers and cash advances than it does for purchases.

You can find information about the grace period in the credit card offer, thanks to federal rules that took effect in 2010. Look for a summary table of rate and fee disclosures, which will include a statement that explains how to avoid paying interest.

If you’re getting the card for points or rewards, this is one you definitely need to ask, says Josh Frank, senior researcher with the Center for Responsible Lending. Some issuers will revoke rewards if you’re late with a payment by even one day, he says.

“A lot of times, the answer they will give you is that they can take away or reduce your rewards for any reason,” he says. While that’s true, the issuer will have a policy on revoking or reducing points, and that’s what you want to ask about, he says. Under what specific circumstances would they reduce or eliminate a customer’s points?

In most cases, “this is one the customer service agent should know the answer to,” he says.

Some card issuers use your purchase records to assess your ongoing creditworthiness.

That means if you suddenly use your card to purchase retread tires, pay for a session with a marriage counselor or make a purchase at a market on a sketchy side of town, you could see your APR climb or your credit limit fall, says Frank. If you see this practice as an invasion of privacy, ask beforehand if the issuer does this, he says.

How to phrase it: Can my transactions ever be used in rating my credit risk?

And that’s one question the customer service representative “might not know the answer to,” says Frank. “You might want to ask them to transfer you to the credit department manager.”

If you are guaranteeing a card account by co-signing for a college student, ask if you will be on the hook for the debt after the other party turns 21, says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center.

Many times, “there is nothing to prevent the issuers from saying you’re going to be guaranteeing this card 15 years from now — long after junior is out of college,” she says.

In addition, find out exactly what has to be done to get you off the account. Are you free to complete those steps yourself? Or will you need the cooperation of someone who might not want you — and those charging privileges — to go away?

Federal regulations limit your liability for unauthorized credit card charges to $50 if you report it within two business days. The longer you wait, the more you may lose. Many issuers cap losses at zero dollars, provided you follow a few rules. So find out how the card would handle charges you didn’t make, says McClary.

Also, does the issuer monitor usage and shut down the card if it sees out-of-the-ordinary charges or spending locations? That feature can be great if you always use the card for the same types of purchases in the same geographic area, but cumbersome if you’re getting the card for travel.

While it sounds counterproductive, you want to ask some detailed questions on how the issuer will treat you if you run into financial problems, says McClary.

Will you lose points or benefits? Will you be hit with late fees or a penalty rate? Ask what those penalties are or look online at the terms and conditions for the card.

Some issuers have programs to slash interest temporarily for customers who get behind, he says. Others don’t. So find out ahead of time what kind of programs the issuer offers that will help you rehabilitate your account and restore your original terms, McClary says.

Ask about the “worst case scenario,” he says. “When do they consider an account to be charged off? And when do they send an account to a collection agency?”

“It may be a little tough to get a hold of that information because it might not be readily available at the customer service level,” says McClary. “You may have to punch it up a level.”





Projects – Development India Limited (PDIL), the limited credit card.#The #limited #credit #card

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Engineering Services

Fertilizer / Chemical Plants, Oil Gas Installations, Refineries etc.

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Oil, Gas, Water Treatment & Solar Energy

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Swachh Bharat Abhiyan

  • Invitation for Expression of Interest (EoI) for proposed strategic Disinvestment of Projects & Development India Limited (PDIL) DownloadCorrigendum for EoI for PDIL disinvestment*Details
  • Strategic disinvestment of PDIL- Reply to pre-bid queries raised by Interested Parties (IPs)Download
  • Preliminary Information Memorandum (PIM) for Inviting Expression of Interest (EoI) for proposed Strategic Disinvestment of Projects & Development India Limited (PDIL) Download
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  • GST CELL at PDIL Download

PDIL At a Glance

We are a premier design engineering and consultancy organization, committed towards technological excellence and self-reliance in the growth of the fertilizer and allied chemical industries with associated off site and utility facilities, Oil & Gas Sector viz. Product pipelines, LPG Terminals, Oil terminals, LPG Bottling Plants, LPG mounded Storages, Methanol Plants, Hydrogen Plants and various acid Plants.

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Woodward Motors Limited – St, the limited credit card.#The #limited #credit #card

Woodward Motors Limited – St. Anthony – a Buick, Chevrolet, GMC vehicle for every lifestyle

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Welcome to Woodward Motors Limited – St. Anthony – Your Hawkes Bay Buick, Chevrolet GMC Source

At Woodward Motors Limited – St. Anthony, you will find a friendly and professional staff. We are guided by one axiom: Our Relentless Focus on Superior Customer Service, Honesty and Delivering the Highest Value to our Customers. We are committed to building relationships that will last generations. Our St. Anthony Buick and GMC dealership carries a wide, unmatched selection of new and used cars, trucks, SUVs, and crossovers to choose from. Whether it is the all-powerful GMC Sierra 1500, the heavy-duty Chevy Silverado 1500, or the luxurious Buick Encore, Woodward Motors Limited – St. Anthony is sure to have the vehicle that’s right for you and your daily commuting needs. Not only that, we offer our valued St. Anthony Buick and GMC drivers the added assurance of a budget-minded and knowledgeable financing department, ready to work on behalf of all your automotive needs. Stop by Woodward Motors Limited – St. Anthony and test-drive a premium new or used GM vehicle today!

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Our financial experts look forward to working with you to get you into your new vehicle. Financing for your new or used Buick or GMC has never been easier than it is today. Speak to our St. Anthony finance specialists about leasing, financing, and payments today. People from Lanse Au Clair and surrounding areas also prefer us for their financial needs. We’ll get you into the vehicle you want at Woodward Motors Limited – St. Anthony.





Here – s Why I Hate Credit Reporting Agencies, what are the three credit reporting agencies.#What #are #the #three #credit #reporting #agencies

Here s Why I Hate Credit Reporting Agencies — And Why You Should Too

A few days ago, Equifax, one of the Big Three credit reporting agencies, admitted that the personal data of 143 million consumers had been compromised. This is not the biggest data breach ever, but it might be the worst. After all, Equifax is not just any company. It s a company whose main job is collecting masses of private financial data—and it does this even though it has neither a business relationship nor explicit permission from the people it monitors. This is a massive and unprecedented FUBAR.

(For more on why the Equifax breach is even worse than you think, Michael Hiltzik explains here.)

What are the three credit reporting agencies

I am no fan of the credit reporting business, one of the most arrogant and anti-consumer industries imaginable. Twelve years ago I wrote about them for the Washington Monthly, and it s startling how little has changed since then. I could republish the story today with only the most cursory changes.

For example, part of my piece was devoted to credit freezes, something you may have heard a lot about lately. This is an action you can take to protect yourself in case of identify theft: if you ask for your account to be frozen, credit agencies will furnish a credit report only after they ve confirmed that it really is you who applied for credit. This stops identity thieves in their tracks: if they apply for a credit card in your name, the credit agency will call you first. When you tell them you never applied for the card, it doesn t get issued.

But this really shouldn t be an option you have to request. It should be routine for all credit transactions. The reason it isn t is because it s inconvenient for the credit reporting agencies, who have fought regulation on this topic tooth and nail. It s also because they literally make money on identify theft—no, that s not a typo—and therefore don t have much incentive to do anything about it.

Still, as much as I think all accounts should be frozen by default, my solution to the problem of identity theft isn t to force the credit reporting agencies to freeze or unfreeze accounts—or to force them to do anything else. It s to make them responsible for all damages related to identity theft and then let them figure out the best solution. Here s what I wrote in my Monthly piece:

There is a successful precedent for this type of approach. In 1968, Congress passed the Truth in Lending Act, which imposed a variety of regulations on the lending industry. One notably simple provision was that consumers could be held liable for no more than $50 if their credit cards were stolen and used without their authorization. For anything above that, it was the credit-card issuer who had to pay. The result was predictable: Credit-card companies have since taken it upon themselves to develop a wide range ofeffective anti-fraud programs. Congress didn t tell them to do it, or even how. It just made them responsible for the losses, and the card issuers did the rest themselves.

The same method should be used for identity theft. There s no need to create mountains of regulations, which are uniformly despised by the credit industry. Instead, simply make the industry itself—and any institution that handles personal data—liable for the losses in both time and money currently borne by consumers. The responsible parties will do the rest themselves.

There s more to say about this, but sadly, my piece is no longer available at the Monthly site. The great linkrot plague has devoured it. Luckily, I m a magazine packrat and I still have a dead-tree copy. So I scanned it and turned it into a PDF. Click here to read it—and to find out just why I hate the credit reporting agencies so intensely. It s worth your time, especially considering how little has been done about this over the past decade. It represents one of the all-time abject surrenders to Big Finance, and it s something the Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party should be all over. The time for small-bore proposals is over. It s time to make the credit agencies—and others—pay for their flagrantly careless behavior. When they allow someone to steal your identity, they re the ones who should pay the price, not you.

UPDATE: The Wayback Machine also has a copy of my article. I shoulda checked! Click here to see it.

Get the scoop, straight from Mother Jones.
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What Is the Fair Credit Reporting Act, what is the fair credit reporting act.#What #is #the #fair #credit #reporting #act

What Is the Fair Credit Reporting Act?

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is a federal law that governs how a credit reporting agency (CRA) handles your credit information. It is designed to protect the integrity and privacy of your credit information. The FCRA requires credit reporting agencies–and the entities that report your credit information to them and others–to ensure that your information is fair and accurate, and kept private. The FCRA protects your right to access and correct any inaccuracies in your credit report and provides you with remedies if a credit reporting agency or information furnisher violates your rights.

For articles on your credit report, credit score, cleaning up your credit report, and more, see Nolo’s Credit Repair topic area.

Who/What is a CRA?

A CRA is any entity that collects and furnishes credit information about you. A common type of CRA is a credit bureau, such as Transunion, Equifax or Experian. A CRA also includes a company or person who collects and sells your credit information (often in the form of background checks) to landlords, employers, or anyone else who makes a credit decision about you.

Obligations of a CRA

A CRA is obligated to:

upon your request, provide you with the information it has on file about you (called your file disclosure ), often for free (to learn how to get your credit report, see Credit Reports Credit Scores)

provide you with your credit score upon your request (you’ll most likely have to pay a fee; see Credit Reports Credit Scores )

investigate disputed credit information in your file (there are a few exceptions to this rule; see When the CRA Does Not Have to Investigate Your Complaint.)

correct or delete any inaccurate, incomplete, or unverifiable information within 30 days of the receiving notice of your dispute (for more on this, see How to Correct Errors on Your Credit Report)

refrain from reporting old credit information, usually more than seven to ten years old (see How Long Does Negative Information Stay on Your Credit Report)

limit disclosure of your credit file to third parties who have a valid need (such as a creditor, landlord, or employer), and

withhold disclosure of your credit information to employers unless you consent.

Who/What is an Information Supplier?

An information supplier is any entity that submits your credit information to a CRA. Usually, that means your creditor. But it could also mean any other third party that you have even a loose credit relationship with, such as a government entity to whom you owe taxes, costs, or fines.

Obligations of an Information Supplier

Under the FCRA, your creditor and any other information supplier:

must not report to a CRA any information about you that it knows — has reasonable cause to know — is inaccurate

has a duty to promptly update and correct any inaccurate information that it previously supplied to the CRA

must tell you about any negative credit information it reports to a CRA within 30 days

must notify the CRA when you voluntarily close an account with it, and

must maintain a reasonable procedure to respond to identity theft notices by a CRA, and refrain from reporting information about an account that you previously reported was the result of identity theft.

If you dispute the inaccurate information with your creditor, in writing, it cannot continue to report the wrong information to the CRA until it investigates. It must also notify the CRA of your dispute.

Users of Credit Information

In addition to CRAs and your creditors, anyone who uses your credit information for employment, credit, or insurance purposes is covered by the FCRA. They must:

notify you if they turn you down based on what they found in your credit report, and

identify the CRA or information supplier who provided the report.





New York governor wants credit-reporting firms to follow cyber rules, Reuters, the three credit reporting agencies.#The #three #credit #reporting #agencies

New York governor wants credit-reporting firms to follow cyber rules

WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) – New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Monday that he wants credit-reporting firms to comply with the state s cyber-security regulations, the latest government official to crack down on the industry in the wake of the massive Equifax hack.

Also on Monday, Bloomberg News reported that federal authorities have opened a criminal probe into stock sales by three Equifax Inc ( EFX.N ) executives before the company disclosed the massive data breach, news that has weighed heavily on the stock price.

The company has said the executives were unaware of the hack when they sold the stock for $1.8 million.

Equifax s legal woes worsened as the U.S Attorney s office in Atlanta issued a statement saying it was working with the FBI on a criminal investigation into the breach and theft of personal information.

Equifax shares rose 1.5 percent on Monday after losing about a third of their value since the hack was announced. The Equifax breach discovered on July 29 exposed sensitive data like Social Security numbers of up to 143 million people.

Cuomo said he planned to require all credit-reporting agencies to register with the state and comply with its cyber-security rules.

The proposed regulation would take effect in February, Cuomo said in a statement. If the companies do not register, they risk being barred from doing business with financial companies regulated by New York state.

The state would be able to bar credit-reporting agencies, including TransUnion ( TRU.N ) and Experian Plc ( EXPN.L ), as well as Equifax, from doing business in New York if the state found they engaged in unfair, deceptive or predatory practices, Cuomo said.

The Equifax breach was a wake-up call, Cuomo said. And with this action, New York is raising the bar for consumer protections that we hope will be replicated across the nation.

Proposed regulations are typically subject to a period for public comment before they become final.

A New York state cyber-security regulation, the first of its kind in the United States, took effect on March 1. It requires financial firms to take measures to protect networks and customer data from hackers and disclose cyber events to regulators.

Maine is the only U.S. state that requires credit agencies to register, said William Lund, superintendent of the Maine Bureau of Consumer Credit Protection. But its law does not cover cyber security, an issue the bureau will have to consider, Lund said.

Maine, which has been registering credit-reporting agencies since the 1990s, has 30 such agencies on its roster, ranging from the largest to those dealing with everything from check approval to tenants rental histories, he added.

The three credit-reporting agencies did not respond to requests for comment on Cuomo s plan.

Bloomberg reported on Monday that the U.S. Justice Department is investigating whether Equifax s chief financial officer, John Gamble, and two other executives broke insider-trading rules by selling stock after the breach was discovered in July and weeks before it was disclosed this month.

Reuters was not able to confirm the Bloomberg report.

Separately, the company issued a statement saying a second Bloomberg report late on Monday about a second cyber attack in March referred to a breach at Equifax payroll unit that was previously reported to regulators, customers and consumers and also been covered by the press.

Equifax complied fully with all consumer notification requirements related to the March incident. The two events are not related, the statement said.

Reporting by Diane Bartz and Suzanne Barlyn; Additional reporting by Sarah N. Lynch, David Shepardson and Dustin Volz; Editing by Jim Finkle, Leslie Adler and Michael Perry





Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card to have.#What #is #the #best #credit #card #to #have

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The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

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These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

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Credit Cards – Compare Best Card Offers & Apply Online, Bankrate, what is the best credit card.#What #is #the #best #credit #card

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When looking to get a credit card, there are a variety of things you should consider. If you want a rewards card to use frequently, you might not mind paying a $100 or $200 annual fee. You should also consider the regular APR (as opposed to the introductory rate) and the interest rate. A good interest rate is dependent on how you will use the card. For example, a 20% interest rate is fine if you plan on paying off the balance every month.

It pays to ask these kinds of questions before you fill out the application form. Here are 9 questions you want answered before you sign on the dotted line.

The “very first question” the consumer should ask is, “Why am I applying for this card? Why do I need this card?” says Bruce McClary, media director for ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling

Some positive reasons: The card has low or no fees, a lower interest rate or offers a rewards program that suits your spending habits. “It has to make sense, and it has to fit into your overall lifestyle,” McClary says.

Do you pay off your credit card balances every month? If so, “you don’t care what the interest rate is because you won’t pay any,” says Ric Edelman, author of “The Truth About Money.” “But you care about the (annual) fee,” he says.

If you run a balance, you want the lowest rate you can get, even if that comes with an annual fee.

One clue to your usage: “Look at your past history,” says Edelman. “Because what you’ve done before is what you will be doing.”

If you’re shopping for a card, chances are you’re comparing card terms. But if an issuer sends you an offer, it’s tempting to apply and see what you get.

“It’s really difficult to pick one (in isolation),” says Kelly Rogers, chief development officer for the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County and adjunct faculty at Chapman University. “If someone just shows you one car, how do you know if it’s the right car for you?”

Her advice: Do a side-by-side comparison of several different cards before you apply.

Don’t be afraid to plug the card name, “complaints” and “customer service” into your favorite search engine. “I go through and see who has the least amount of complaints and issues,” says Rogers.

Some cards will give you a range of rates you could get, but often that window is pretty wide, says Nick Bourke, director of the Safe Credit Card Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Other cards may offer a specific rate (or terms) and either approve or reject you.

If you’re operating totally in the dark, you have another option: Apply by phone and push for an answer on your rate and credit line before the account is opened.

While there are no guarantees, sometimes you can get an answer, says Bourke.

“I’ve actually done this myself,” he says, admitting “you do have to go pretty far in the process.”

You may have to ask for the department that’s actually evaluating your application to get an answer, he says.

“The thing that you want to do is when you’re talking to the person on the phone taking your application is you want to push them as hard as you can to get your APR and credit line,” Bourke says. Then, once you have the information and before the account is opened in your name, “you can say yes or no at that point,” he says.

According to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, if a card offers a lower interest rate during an introductory period, the promotional rate has to last at least six months. While that introductory offer may be appealing, the regular rate is what you’re really buying.

So find out when the introductory APR expires and what the new rate will be. You can find this information online in the terms and conditions for the card or you can ask a service representative.

Another smart question: How long is that grace period? “Some cards start charging interest immediately,” says Edelman. A card can have different grace periods for balance transfers and cash advances than it does for purchases.

You can find information about the grace period in the credit card offer, thanks to federal rules that took effect in 2010. Look for a summary table of rate and fee disclosures, which will include a statement that explains how to avoid paying interest.

If you’re getting the card for points or rewards, this is one you definitely need to ask, says Josh Frank, senior researcher with the Center for Responsible Lending. Some issuers will revoke rewards if you’re late with a payment by even one day, he says.

“A lot of times, the answer they will give you is that they can take away or reduce your rewards for any reason,” he says. While that’s true, the issuer will have a policy on revoking or reducing points, and that’s what you want to ask about, he says. Under what specific circumstances would they reduce or eliminate a customer’s points?

In most cases, “this is one the customer service agent should know the answer to,” he says.

Some card issuers use your purchase records to assess your ongoing creditworthiness.

That means if you suddenly use your card to purchase retread tires, pay for a session with a marriage counselor or make a purchase at a market on a sketchy side of town, you could see your APR climb or your credit limit fall, says Frank. If you see this practice as an invasion of privacy, ask beforehand if the issuer does this, he says.

How to phrase it: Can my transactions ever be used in rating my credit risk?

And that’s one question the customer service representative “might not know the answer to,” says Frank. “You might want to ask them to transfer you to the credit department manager.”

If you are guaranteeing a card account by co-signing for a college student, ask if you will be on the hook for the debt after the other party turns 21, says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center.

Many times, “there is nothing to prevent the issuers from saying you’re going to be guaranteeing this card 15 years from now — long after junior is out of college,” she says.

In addition, find out exactly what has to be done to get you off the account. Are you free to complete those steps yourself? Or will you need the cooperation of someone who might not want you — and those charging privileges — to go away?

Federal regulations limit your liability for unauthorized credit card charges to $50 if you report it within two business days. The longer you wait, the more you may lose. Many issuers cap losses at zero dollars, provided you follow a few rules. So find out how the card would handle charges you didn’t make, says McClary.

Also, does the issuer monitor usage and shut down the card if it sees out-of-the-ordinary charges or spending locations? That feature can be great if you always use the card for the same types of purchases in the same geographic area, but cumbersome if you’re getting the card for travel.

While it sounds counterproductive, you want to ask some detailed questions on how the issuer will treat you if you run into financial problems, says McClary.

Will you lose points or benefits? Will you be hit with late fees or a penalty rate? Ask what those penalties are or look online at the terms and conditions for the card.

Some issuers have programs to slash interest temporarily for customers who get behind, he says. Others don’t. So find out ahead of time what kind of programs the issuer offers that will help you rehabilitate your account and restore your original terms, McClary says.

Ask about the “worst case scenario,” he says. “When do they consider an account to be charged off? And when do they send an account to a collection agency?”

“It may be a little tough to get a hold of that information because it might not be readily available at the customer service level,” says McClary. “You may have to punch it up a level.”





Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card.#What #is #the #best #credit #card

Credit Cards

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What credit score do you need for a premium rewards credit card?

Latest Articles

What is the best credit card

Business Platinum Card from American Express vs. Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express

Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on the website are from companies from which this site receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this [. ]

What is the best credit card

U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

What is the best credit card

Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

What is the best credit card

Current Credit Card Interest Rates

View current credit card rates based on Bankrate.com’s weekly national survey of large banks and thrifts.

What is the best credit card

Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

Your annual credit card spending will determine which of these rewards cards is right for you.

What is the best credit card

Black Friday 2017: Find the best credit card strategy for you

Using the right card can help you maximize rewards and save money while holiday shopping.

What is the best credit card

6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

There are ways you can prevent a card closing, but sometimes it’s out of your control.

What is the best credit card

Uber’s new rewards credit card zooms ahead of the pack

You may be floored by the souped-up rewards on dining and travel spending.

What is the best credit card

Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

What is the best credit card

Best credit card tips for November 2017

These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

RELATED TOPICS

HELPFUL LINKS

Maximize Your Money. Get Expert Advice Tools. Master Life’s Financial Journey.

You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for four decades.

Our tools, rates and advice help no matter where you are on life’s financial journey.

How we make money

Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.

2017 Bankrate, LLC All Rights Reserved.





Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card.#What #is #the #best #credit #card

Credit Cards

Learn how the right credit card can become a power financial tool, from paying off debt faster to earning rewards and perks.

What would you like to do?

Credit Card Offers

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What is the best credit card

Why 0% financing from retailers can be a bad deal

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Should you use a balance transfer credit card to pay down debt?

What is the best credit card

4 tips to maximize your rewards credit cards

What is the best credit card

6 risky ways to pay off credit card debt

What is the best credit card

What credit score do you need for a premium rewards credit card?

Latest Articles

What is the best credit card

Business Platinum Card from American Express vs. Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express

Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on the website are from companies from which this site receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this [. ]

What is the best credit card

U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

What is the best credit card

Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

What is the best credit card

Current Credit Card Interest Rates

View current credit card rates based on Bankrate.com’s weekly national survey of large banks and thrifts.

What is the best credit card

Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

Your annual credit card spending will determine which of these rewards cards is right for you.

What is the best credit card

Black Friday 2017: Find the best credit card strategy for you

Using the right card can help you maximize rewards and save money while holiday shopping.

What is the best credit card

6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

There are ways you can prevent a card closing, but sometimes it’s out of your control.

What is the best credit card

Uber’s new rewards credit card zooms ahead of the pack

You may be floored by the souped-up rewards on dining and travel spending.

What is the best credit card

Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

What is the best credit card

Best credit card tips for November 2017

These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

RELATED TOPICS

HELPFUL LINKS

Maximize Your Money. Get Expert Advice Tools. Master Life’s Financial Journey.

You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for four decades.

Our tools, rates and advice help no matter where you are on life’s financial journey.

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Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.

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Projects – Development India Limited (PDIL), the limited credit card.#The #limited #credit #card

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Engineering Services

Fertilizer / Chemical Plants, Oil Gas Installations, Refineries etc.

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Oil, Gas, Water Treatment & Solar Energy

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  • Strategic disinvestment of PDIL- Reply to pre-bid queries raised by Interested Parties (IPs)Download
  • Preliminary Information Memorandum (PIM) for Inviting Expression of Interest (EoI) for proposed Strategic Disinvestment of Projects & Development India Limited (PDIL) Download
  • Press Advertisement for Invitation for Expression of Interest (EoI) for proposed strategic Disinvestment of Projects & Development India Limited (PDIL) Download
  • Observation of Swachhta Pakhwada at PDILDownload
  • GST CELL at PDIL Download

PDIL At a Glance

We are a premier design engineering and consultancy organization, committed towards technological excellence and self-reliance in the growth of the fertilizer and allied chemical industries with associated off site and utility facilities, Oil & Gas Sector viz. Product pipelines, LPG Terminals, Oil terminals, LPG Bottling Plants, LPG mounded Storages, Methanol Plants, Hydrogen Plants and various acid Plants.

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Bendigo Bank – Bank Accounts, Credit Cards & Home Loans, the limited credit card.#The #limited #credit #card

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Simply by banking with us you become part of the change that helps support and sustain Australian communities nationwide. See the change your banking makes.

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Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card to have.#What #is #the #best #credit #card #to #have

Credit Cards

Learn how the right credit card can become a power financial tool, from paying off debt faster to earning rewards and perks.

What would you like to do?

Credit Card Offers

Payoff Calculator

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Editor’s Picks

What is the best credit card to have

Why 0% financing from retailers can be a bad deal

What is the best credit card to have

Should you use a balance transfer credit card to pay down debt?

What is the best credit card to have

4 tips to maximize your rewards credit cards

What is the best credit card to have

6 risky ways to pay off credit card debt

What is the best credit card to have

What credit score do you need for a premium rewards credit card?

Latest Articles

What is the best credit card to have

Business Platinum Card from American Express vs. Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express

Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on the website are from companies from which this site receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this [. ]

What is the best credit card to have

U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

What is the best credit card to have

Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

What is the best credit card to have

Current Credit Card Interest Rates

View current credit card rates based on Bankrate.com’s weekly national survey of large banks and thrifts.

What is the best credit card to have

Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

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What is the best credit card to have

Black Friday 2017: Find the best credit card strategy for you

Using the right card can help you maximize rewards and save money while holiday shopping.

What is the best credit card to have

6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

There are ways you can prevent a card closing, but sometimes it’s out of your control.

What is the best credit card to have

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What is the best credit card to have

Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

What is the best credit card to have

Best credit card tips for November 2017

These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

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Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card to have.#What #is #the #best #credit #card #to #have

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What is the best credit card to have

Business Platinum Card from American Express vs. Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express

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What is the best credit card to have

U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

What is the best credit card to have

Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

What is the best credit card to have

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What is the best credit card to have

Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

Your annual credit card spending will determine which of these rewards cards is right for you.

What is the best credit card to have

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What is the best credit card to have

6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

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What is the best credit card to have

Uber’s new rewards credit card zooms ahead of the pack

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What is the best credit card to have

Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

What is the best credit card to have

Best credit card tips for November 2017

These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

RELATED TOPICS

HELPFUL LINKS

Maximize Your Money. Get Expert Advice Tools. Master Life’s Financial Journey.

You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for four decades.

Our tools, rates and advice help no matter where you are on life’s financial journey.

How we make money

Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.

2017 Bankrate, LLC All Rights Reserved.





Credit Cards – Our Best 0% Credit Card Deals, the limited credit card.#The #limited #credit #card

Compare credit cards

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Using Smart Search makes you less likely to be one of the millions of people who get declined for credit cards every year. Smart Search shows you which cards you’re most likely to be accepted for, so you can avoid the ones that are more likely to decline you. Getting declined can damage your credit score, and this makes it harder to borrow money in the future.

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Credit cards come in all shapes sizes, finding one that suits you can make a world of difference to your pocket.

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A credit card can be a useful addition to any wallet, purse or pocket. Find out what type of card will suit you best.

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Find out more about how balance transfer credit cards work and what s available.

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Frequently asked questions

It’s hard to imagine life without a credit card as these days you can use them almost anywhere, anytime. Perhaps you want to splash out in the sales, treat your family to a holiday or maybe indulge in some online shopping. There’s no doubt that credit cards can be a quick and easy way to pay for a wide range of goods and services. Plus, you can spread the cost over several months, allowing you to budget. But picking the right credit card can be confusing as there are so many different deals on the market. Our guide explains how credit cards work – and how to select the right card for you.

What is a credit card?

A credit card is basically a loan, but if you clear your balance in full when you receive your monthly statement, the loan is interest free. If you can’t afford to pay off the outstanding debt, you can make monthly payments, but you will normally be charged interest. The rates vary, but 19% is typical.

Credit card comparison

When using our credit card comparison tool, decide what you are going to use the card for. You can choose between balance transfer cards, purchase cards, money transfer cards, cards that reward your spending and cards to use abroad

  • 0% purchase cards: enable you to buy items upfront, while paying off the amount you’ve spent over a stated period without incurring any interest charges.
  • Balance transfer cards: enable you to transfer an existing credit card balance to a new card that charges less interest.
  • Reward cards: – these cards offer cashback or loyalty points.

If you want to use a card for shopping, there’s little point in applying for a 0% balance transfer rate. Shoppers should search for a deal that offers a low rate on purchases. Some cards, for example, charge 0% on purchases for a number of months, and they can be a cost effective way to pay for a big ticket item, such as a washing machine or sofa. If you clear the debt before the 0% deal expires, you will pay no interest whatsoever.

Low rate cards are better suited to people who are not able to pay their balance in full each month. There is no introductory interest rate offer. Instead, you will pay a relatively low rate of interest for as long as it takes to clear your debt.

People who have run up debts on another card or cards at a high rate of interest can save money with a balance transfer deal. Let’s say you have accumulated debts of £3000 on a card that charges interest at 19%. If you switch the outstanding balance to a card that charges 0% interest for 24 months, you can instantly cut the cost of your debt.

Reward cards are ideal if you pay off your balance every month as the interest rate is irrelevant. You can therefore look out for a card that offers cashback or loyalty points.

There are also various deals available for people who take their credit card abroad and for those who have a poor credit history.

Pros and cons of credit cards

Credit cards can be a great way to pay for goods and services without having to stump up the money upfront. You can even use your credit card like an interest-free loan, allowing you to borrow money for free. You also get some protection under the Consumer Credit Act if you buy something with a credit card.

But let’s not forget that it’s easy to run up expensive debts with a credit card, especially if you pay off only the minimum balance each month. You can also get into financial difficulty if you don’t stick to the rules. For example, most companies charge a penalty if you miss a payment, make a late payment or breach your credit limit. Bear in mind, too, that most issuers reserve their best deals for people with a spotless credit record, so your application could be turned down.

Find the right credit card

The best credit card for you depends on whether you will pay off your balance each month and how you intend to use the card. Smart Search will ask you a selection of questions to help determine which type of credit card best suits your needs, without leaving a mark on your credit file.

There are hundreds of different credit card deals but you can compare all the leading offers quickly and easily with Moneysupermarket’s online service. So, whether you want to switch a balance or you are looking for a 0% deal on purchases, we have all the information you need at the click of a mouse.

Moneysupermarket is a credit broker – this means we’ll show you products offered by lenders. We never take a fee from customers for this broking service. Instead we are usually paid a fee by the lenders – though the size of that payment doesn’t affect how we show products to customers.

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  • Invitation for Expression of Interest (EoI) for proposed strategic Disinvestment of Projects & Development India Limited (PDIL) DownloadCorrigendum for EoI for PDIL disinvestment*Details
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  • Preliminary Information Memorandum (PIM) for Inviting Expression of Interest (EoI) for proposed Strategic Disinvestment of Projects & Development India Limited (PDIL) Download
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  • Observation of Swachhta Pakhwada at PDILDownload
  • GST CELL at PDIL Download

PDIL At a Glance

We are a premier design engineering and consultancy organization, committed towards technological excellence and self-reliance in the growth of the fertilizer and allied chemical industries with associated off site and utility facilities, Oil & Gas Sector viz. Product pipelines, LPG Terminals, Oil terminals, LPG Bottling Plants, LPG mounded Storages, Methanol Plants, Hydrogen Plants and various acid Plants.

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Here – s Why I Hate Credit Reporting Agencies, what are the three credit reporting agencies.#What #are #the #three #credit #reporting #agencies

Here s Why I Hate Credit Reporting Agencies — And Why You Should Too

A few days ago, Equifax, one of the Big Three credit reporting agencies, admitted that the personal data of 143 million consumers had been compromised. This is not the biggest data breach ever, but it might be the worst. After all, Equifax is not just any company. It s a company whose main job is collecting masses of private financial data—and it does this even though it has neither a business relationship nor explicit permission from the people it monitors. This is a massive and unprecedented FUBAR.

(For more on why the Equifax breach is even worse than you think, Michael Hiltzik explains here.)

What are the three credit reporting agencies

I am no fan of the credit reporting business, one of the most arrogant and anti-consumer industries imaginable. Twelve years ago I wrote about them for the Washington Monthly, and it s startling how little has changed since then. I could republish the story today with only the most cursory changes.

For example, part of my piece was devoted to credit freezes, something you may have heard a lot about lately. This is an action you can take to protect yourself in case of identify theft: if you ask for your account to be frozen, credit agencies will furnish a credit report only after they ve confirmed that it really is you who applied for credit. This stops identity thieves in their tracks: if they apply for a credit card in your name, the credit agency will call you first. When you tell them you never applied for the card, it doesn t get issued.

But this really shouldn t be an option you have to request. It should be routine for all credit transactions. The reason it isn t is because it s inconvenient for the credit reporting agencies, who have fought regulation on this topic tooth and nail. It s also because they literally make money on identify theft—no, that s not a typo—and therefore don t have much incentive to do anything about it.

Still, as much as I think all accounts should be frozen by default, my solution to the problem of identity theft isn t to force the credit reporting agencies to freeze or unfreeze accounts—or to force them to do anything else. It s to make them responsible for all damages related to identity theft and then let them figure out the best solution. Here s what I wrote in my Monthly piece:

There is a successful precedent for this type of approach. In 1968, Congress passed the Truth in Lending Act, which imposed a variety of regulations on the lending industry. One notably simple provision was that consumers could be held liable for no more than $50 if their credit cards were stolen and used without their authorization. For anything above that, it was the credit-card issuer who had to pay. The result was predictable: Credit-card companies have since taken it upon themselves to develop a wide range ofeffective anti-fraud programs. Congress didn t tell them to do it, or even how. It just made them responsible for the losses, and the card issuers did the rest themselves.

The same method should be used for identity theft. There s no need to create mountains of regulations, which are uniformly despised by the credit industry. Instead, simply make the industry itself—and any institution that handles personal data—liable for the losses in both time and money currently borne by consumers. The responsible parties will do the rest themselves.

There s more to say about this, but sadly, my piece is no longer available at the Monthly site. The great linkrot plague has devoured it. Luckily, I m a magazine packrat and I still have a dead-tree copy. So I scanned it and turned it into a PDF. Click here to read it—and to find out just why I hate the credit reporting agencies so intensely. It s worth your time, especially considering how little has been done about this over the past decade. It represents one of the all-time abject surrenders to Big Finance, and it s something the Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party should be all over. The time for small-bore proposals is over. It s time to make the credit agencies—and others—pay for their flagrantly careless behavior. When they allow someone to steal your identity, they re the ones who should pay the price, not you.

UPDATE: The Wayback Machine also has a copy of my article. I shoulda checked! Click here to see it.

Get the scoop, straight from Mother Jones.
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  • What are the three credit reporting agencies





A Layman s Guide to Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) – Credit Reporting, the fair credit reporting act.#The #fair #credit #reporting #act

Layman’s Guide to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) by section:

go to Section 605B.

  • Section 606В – One of the main point of this section on investigate consumer reports, like employment reports, is that there are required disclosures that must be made to consumers — go to Section 606.
  • Section 607В – Compliance section, which means that CRA’s must maintain reasonable procedures to avoid violating Section 604 and 605 of the Act, such as providing obsolete information or furnishing reports for non permitted purposes — go to Section 607.
  • Section 608В – When a government agency can see your report and what they can see — go to Section 608.
  • Section 609В – What must be disclosed to consumers upon request — go to Section 609.
  • Section 610В – To obtain your own report, consumers must provide identification, and disclosures must generally be in writing — go to Section 610.
  • Section 611В – Procedures when the consumer disputes the accuracy or completeness of an item in their file — go to Section 611.
  • Section 612В – Not all credit reports are free, some may incur a fee — go to Section 612.
  • Section 613В – CRA’s must be careful about furnishing public records for employment reports — go to Section 613.
  • Section 614В – Talks about investigative consumer reports and using information from an old report — go to Section 614.
  • Section 615В – Users and others who obtain consumer reports have important responsibilities — go to Section 615.
  • Section 616В – Dollar liability for those who willfully violate the Act — go to Section 616.
  • Section 617В – Liability for those who are negligent in failing to comply with the Act — Section 617.
  • Section 618В – Bring actions in US district courts within a specified time frame — go to Section 618.
  • Section 619В – Fines and potential imprisonment for obtaining information under false pretenses — go to Section 619.
  • Section 620В – Fines and potential imprisonment for the officers and employees of the CRA — go to Section 620.
  • Section 621В – The Federal Trade Commission is the main enforcer of the Act — Section 621.
  • Section 622В – Requirements regarding the reporting of overdue child support — go to Section 622.
  • Section 623В – Companies that report your credit information have important responsibilities — Section 623.
  • Section 624В – Governs affiliates who may have access to the report for marketing etc. — go to Section 624.
  • Section 625В – Does not exempt state laws except to extent state law is inconsistent with this law — go to Section 625.
  • Section 626В – The FBI has special rights to see your file — go to Section 626.
  • Section 627В – Counterterrorism has special rights to see your file — go to Section 627.
  • Section 628В – Properly dispose of consumer information to protect the confidentiality of the information — go to Section 628.
  • Section 629В – Prevents consumer reporting agencies from circumventing the law — Section 629.
  • The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is designed to help ensure that CRAs (Consumer Reporting Agencies, including credit bureaus and credit reporting companies) furnish correct and complete information to businesses to use when evaluating your application for credit, or insurance, or to employers or prospective employers.

    Your rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act include:

    • You have the right to receive a copy of your credit report. The copy of your report must contain all of the information in your file at the time of your request.
    • If you contest the completeness or accuracy of information in your report, you may file a dispute with the CRA and with the company that furnished the information to the CRA. Genrally both the CRA and the furnisher of information are legally obligated to reinvestigate your dispute as long as it is not frivolous.
    • CRA’s must correct or remove inaccurate, incomplete or unverifiable information in their files. CRA’s must remove obsolete information in their files.
    • If you are a victim of identity theft or are on active duty with the militar, you have more rights under the FCRA.
    • Only those with a permitted purpose or with your express permission may access your file.
    • Generally employers must have your express written permision to obtain your report.
    • Any company that denies your application, or takes an adverse action against you, based on information obtained from a CRA, must inform you of the adverse action and must supply you with the name and address of the CRA they used.
    • You have the right to a free copy of your credit report in numerous instances including when your application for credit or employment is adversely affected because of information supplied by the CRA. You can get a free credit report each year in any case.
    • You may opt-out of lists provided by the national credit bureaus that are based on your credit file.
    • You may sue under the FCRA for violations of the Act.
    • Credit scores are available to you on request from from mortgage credit agencies and sometimes from mortgage lenders. There may be a fee for the score.




    What Is the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the fair credit reporting act.#The #fair #credit #reporting #act

    What Is the Fair Credit Reporting Act?

    The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is a federal law that governs how a credit reporting agency (CRA) handles your credit information. It is designed to protect the integrity and privacy of your credit information. The FCRA requires credit reporting agencies–and the entities that report your credit information to them and others–to ensure that your information is fair and accurate, and kept private. The FCRA protects your right to access and correct any inaccuracies in your credit report and provides you with remedies if a credit reporting agency or information furnisher violates your rights.

    For articles on your credit report, credit score, cleaning up your credit report, and more, see Nolo’s Credit Repair topic area.

    Who/What is a CRA?

    A CRA is any entity that collects and furnishes credit information about you. A common type of CRA is a credit bureau, such as Transunion, Equifax or Experian. A CRA also includes a company or person who collects and sells your credit information (often in the form of background checks) to landlords, employers, or anyone else who makes a credit decision about you.

    Obligations of a CRA

    A CRA is obligated to:

    upon your request, provide you with the information it has on file about you (called your file disclosure ), often for free (to learn how to get your credit report, see Credit Reports Credit Scores)

    provide you with your credit score upon your request (you’ll most likely have to pay a fee; see Credit Reports Credit Scores )

    investigate disputed credit information in your file (there are a few exceptions to this rule; see When the CRA Does Not Have to Investigate Your Complaint.)

    correct or delete any inaccurate, incomplete, or unverifiable information within 30 days of the receiving notice of your dispute (for more on this, see How to Correct Errors on Your Credit Report)

    refrain from reporting old credit information, usually more than seven to ten years old (see How Long Does Negative Information Stay on Your Credit Report)

    limit disclosure of your credit file to third parties who have a valid need (such as a creditor, landlord, or employer), and

    withhold disclosure of your credit information to employers unless you consent.

    Who/What is an Information Supplier?

    An information supplier is any entity that submits your credit information to a CRA. Usually, that means your creditor. But it could also mean any other third party that you have even a loose credit relationship with, such as a government entity to whom you owe taxes, costs, or fines.

    Obligations of an Information Supplier

    Under the FCRA, your creditor and any other information supplier:

    must not report to a CRA any information about you that it knows — has reasonable cause to know — is inaccurate

    has a duty to promptly update and correct any inaccurate information that it previously supplied to the CRA

    must tell you about any negative credit information it reports to a CRA within 30 days

    must notify the CRA when you voluntarily close an account with it, and

    must maintain a reasonable procedure to respond to identity theft notices by a CRA, and refrain from reporting information about an account that you previously reported was the result of identity theft.

    If you dispute the inaccurate information with your creditor, in writing, it cannot continue to report the wrong information to the CRA until it investigates. It must also notify the CRA of your dispute.

    Users of Credit Information

    In addition to CRAs and your creditors, anyone who uses your credit information for employment, credit, or insurance purposes is covered by the FCRA. They must:

    notify you if they turn you down based on what they found in your credit report, and

    identify the CRA or information supplier who provided the report.





    A Layman s Guide to Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) – Credit Reporting, what is the fair credit reporting act.#What #is #the #fair #credit #reporting #act

    Layman’s Guide to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) by section:

    go to Section 605B.

  • Section 606В – One of the main point of this section on investigate consumer reports, like employment reports, is that there are required disclosures that must be made to consumers — go to Section 606.
  • Section 607В – Compliance section, which means that CRA’s must maintain reasonable procedures to avoid violating Section 604 and 605 of the Act, such as providing obsolete information or furnishing reports for non permitted purposes — go to Section 607.
  • Section 608В – When a government agency can see your report and what they can see — go to Section 608.
  • Section 609В – What must be disclosed to consumers upon request — go to Section 609.
  • Section 610В – To obtain your own report, consumers must provide identification, and disclosures must generally be in writing — go to Section 610.
  • Section 611В – Procedures when the consumer disputes the accuracy or completeness of an item in their file — go to Section 611.
  • Section 612В – Not all credit reports are free, some may incur a fee — go to Section 612.
  • Section 613В – CRA’s must be careful about furnishing public records for employment reports — go to Section 613.
  • Section 614В – Talks about investigative consumer reports and using information from an old report — go to Section 614.
  • Section 615В – Users and others who obtain consumer reports have important responsibilities — go to Section 615.
  • Section 616В – Dollar liability for those who willfully violate the Act — go to Section 616.
  • Section 617В – Liability for those who are negligent in failing to comply with the Act — Section 617.
  • Section 618В – Bring actions in US district courts within a specified time frame — go to Section 618.
  • Section 619В – Fines and potential imprisonment for obtaining information under false pretenses — go to Section 619.
  • Section 620В – Fines and potential imprisonment for the officers and employees of the CRA — go to Section 620.
  • Section 621В – The Federal Trade Commission is the main enforcer of the Act — Section 621.
  • Section 622В – Requirements regarding the reporting of overdue child support — go to Section 622.
  • Section 623В – Companies that report your credit information have important responsibilities — Section 623.
  • Section 624В – Governs affiliates who may have access to the report for marketing etc. — go to Section 624.
  • Section 625В – Does not exempt state laws except to extent state law is inconsistent with this law — go to Section 625.
  • Section 626В – The FBI has special rights to see your file — go to Section 626.
  • Section 627В – Counterterrorism has special rights to see your file — go to Section 627.
  • Section 628В – Properly dispose of consumer information to protect the confidentiality of the information — go to Section 628.
  • Section 629В – Prevents consumer reporting agencies from circumventing the law — Section 629.
  • The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is designed to help ensure that CRAs (Consumer Reporting Agencies, including credit bureaus and credit reporting companies) furnish correct and complete information to businesses to use when evaluating your application for credit, or insurance, or to employers or prospective employers.

    Your rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act include:

    • You have the right to receive a copy of your credit report. The copy of your report must contain all of the information in your file at the time of your request.
    • If you contest the completeness or accuracy of information in your report, you may file a dispute with the CRA and with the company that furnished the information to the CRA. Genrally both the CRA and the furnisher of information are legally obligated to reinvestigate your dispute as long as it is not frivolous.
    • CRA’s must correct or remove inaccurate, incomplete or unverifiable information in their files. CRA’s must remove obsolete information in their files.
    • If you are a victim of identity theft or are on active duty with the militar, you have more rights under the FCRA.
    • Only those with a permitted purpose or with your express permission may access your file.
    • Generally employers must have your express written permision to obtain your report.
    • Any company that denies your application, or takes an adverse action against you, based on information obtained from a CRA, must inform you of the adverse action and must supply you with the name and address of the CRA they used.
    • You have the right to a free copy of your credit report in numerous instances including when your application for credit or employment is adversely affected because of information supplied by the CRA. You can get a free credit report each year in any case.
    • You may opt-out of lists provided by the national credit bureaus that are based on your credit file.
    • You may sue under the FCRA for violations of the Act.
    • Credit scores are available to you on request from from mortgage credit agencies and sometimes from mortgage lenders. There may be a fee for the score.




    Credit Report – Check Your Credit Rating or Score Today, the three credit reporting agencies.#The #three #credit #reporting #agencies

    The three credit reporting agenciesMoneySuperMarket.com

    Primary Navigation

    Do you know what your credit score is? Find out your credit rating and keep track of any changes to it. Not only will this improve your chances of being accepted for a credit card or loan, but you ll also be able to spot any suspicious activity on your credit file.

    The three credit reporting agencies

    Credit Reports, Monitoring & Identity Theft Protection

      • Provider/Product name The three credit reporting agencies

    Experian CreditExpert

    £14.99 per month

    Unlimited access to your Experian Credit Score and credit report

    Expert advice to help improve your Experian credit score

    The UK’s most trusted Credit Score (Source: ICMUnlimited survey, July 2016)

    Access to an award-winning UK Customer Contact Centre and dedicated Victim of Fraud Team

    Equifax

    £14.95 per month

    – 30 day FREE trial

    – Unlimited, easy online access to your latest Equifax Credit Report Score

    – Identity protection Be alerted if we find your details are shared on websites used by fraudsters

    – Telephone support 8am 8pm daily (except 25th 26th December)

    – Online help and dispute resolution

    Credit Angel

    £14.99 per month

    Easy to use site with unlimited FREE access to your credit score and report for 30 days

    See how your social media activity can affect your ability to gain credit

    Credit and Fraud alerts

    Tailored finance deals, savings and vouchers

    Comprehensive support from Credit Angel’s expert Customer Care Team

    Credit report

    You can boost your chances of being accepted for a credit card or loan by finding out your credit score first. Knowledge is power, so being in the know by being party to the same information as the lender, will place you in a much stronger position.

    Are you aware of what sort of information is held on your credit file? Unless you regularly check your file, the chances are you don t know, but finding out can help you work out the best ways to improve your rating.

    The information held on your credit file helps lenders to decide whether or not they will accept your credit card, mortgage, loan or even mobile phone contract application.

    If you know you ve made a few financial slip ups in the past and your credit score could be better, or you ve never borrowed and so haven t yet built up a credit history in the first place, there are steps you can take to improve your rating so you are more likely to be accepted if you want to take out a loan or apply for a credit card.

    Are you on the electoral roll?

    If you have registered to vote, then you should already be on the electoral roll at your current address. The electoral roll is used by many companies to check you are who you say you are, so they can ensure someone else isn t using your identity fraudulently to make credit applications in your name. If you’re not registered on the electoral roll, you ll need to get in touch with your local council and request a registration form, or alternatively you can register online.

    Are you already a borrower?

    It might sound odd, but if you ve never borrowed money before, lenders are likely to see this as a negative. They want to know that you can manage your money responsibly, and if you have never borrowed, this cannot be demonstrated. If you haven t ever had a credit card or loan, it may therefore be worth opening an account in order to create a credit history but make sure you repay what you owe and on time, otherwise you could end up with a black mark on your credit file.

    Check your credit rating

    Are you certain that the information held about you is absolutely right? It is worth checking your file to make sure that it does not contain details that are wrong and could restrict your chances of being accepted credit. You can get a copy of your credit report at our credit monitoring service. And if you find any inaccuracies you can apply to the relevant agency to get them changed.

    County Court Judgments (CCJs)

    If you’ve had a County Court Judgement against you which has now been settled, make sure this is recorded on your credit file, as having one which hasn t yet been settled can have a very negative impact on your credit rating. If your CCJ isn t showing up as being settled, ask the court to provide confirmation details and pass these on to the credit rating agencies.

    Don t make repeated applications

    If you are turned down for credit, don t be tempted to make lots of other applications elsewhere. These will leave a footprint on your credit file which could work against you as lenders might think you are desperate to borrow money, or that you are victim of identity fraud. Before making any credit application, get hold of a copy of your report so you know how strong your credit rating is, and only make applications for deals you are confident you will be accepted for.

    Change of circumstances

    If your personal situation has changed, for example, you ve got divorced or lost your job, and you are finding it difficult to make ends meet, you must let lenders know as soon as possible. You can put a Notice of Correction on your credit file explaining why you might have missed any payments. Lenders should take this into consideration when you make a credit application, particularly if you are able to show you have subsequently got back on track financially.

    Keep borrowing in check

    Don t max out your credit card. If you owe money on your card, you should try and ensure it isn t more than a third of your overall credit limit. If you often own much more than this, then lenders might start to worry about lending you any more money as they will be concerned you might not be able to keep up with repayments.

    Pay on time

    Make sure payments go out on time by setting up direct debits and standing orders wherever possible. It’s easy to forget a payment so setting up direct debits and standing orders with your bank will ensure payments go out on time. This will also ensure you won t be stung by any penalty charges or fees for paying late, which could have a negative impact on your credit rating.

    Shut down credit accounts you no longer use

    If you ve got credit cards or other credit accounts which you don t need any more, shut them down as soon as possible. When lenders look at your credit file, they focus on the total amount of credit available to you, as opposed to the amount you actually owe, so having lots of open accounts could reduce your credit rating.

    Pay on time

    Missing or late loan or credit card repayments will work against you and leave a black mark on your credit file. Make sure you always pay on time as this will show lenders that you are good at managing your money.

    Other factors which can have an impact

    As well as looking carefully at your credit history, when you apply for credit lenders will also want to check how long you have been a UK resident. If you have only recently moved here, you may have to wait at least three months before you apply for a credit card. You may also have to show proof of your income and provide evidence of employment.

    How our site works

    We want to show you as many credit reporting companies as possible, so you can choose the one that suits you best. We can t promise to show you every single company, because some don t want to be included on comparison websites. We ve ranked the companies according to the fee they pay us, from highest to lowest. This doesn t necessarily mean that the company at the top of the list is the best one for you make sure you compare them to find the one that suits you best. You can find out more about how we work here.





    Three Credit Bureaus Agencies, the three credit reporting agencies.#The #three #credit #reporting #agencies

    Information on the 3 National Credit Reporting Agencies or Credit Bureaus

    The 3 national credit reporting agencies in the United States are Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. Experian was formerly known as TRW. A fourth national credit reporting agency named Innovis exists, but does not currently seem to factor into decisions for denials of credit, insurance or employment. It is more in a development stage.

    To contact the 3 national credit reporting agencies:

    The three national credit agencies may be contacted directly at:

    Equifax

    TransUnion

    Experian

    Atlanta, GA 30374

    Chester, PA 19022

    These national credit agencies are for-profit companies owned by their shareholders. They are not government entities or funded by the government. There are also independent, non-national, local credit bureaus throughout the country that are generally affiliated with one of the 3 national credit reporting agencies. Local bureaus are sometimes for-profit companies and sometimes non-profit associations of lender/members in a particular geographical area.

    The 3 national credit reporting agencies are competitors of each other, and they do not normally share their credit information except in special cases. That is why it is important to order a credit report from all three.

    Credit agencies or bureaus gather their consumer credit information by soliciting creditors such as credit card companies, banks, and lenders to join their systems and contribute their credit experience on consumers to the systems. In return for submitting information to the systems, creditor members may use the system to obtain credit information on consumers to approve credit decisions or review existing consumer accounts.

    Credit agencies are generally regulated by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), which is the Federal law generally covering consumer reporting agencies including credit reporting in this country. Individual states may also have their own versions of the law.

    Under Federal law credit reporting companies known as CRAs (consumer reporting agencies) have numerous responsibilities to protect consumers and their credit information. A Summary of the FCRA is at http://www.creditreporting.com/fair-credit-reporting-act/index.html .

    Opt Out Number For List Sales by the National Credit Reporting Agencies

    IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT OF 1996.

    The credit reporting industry has designated a single toll free number that will allow consumers to opt out of promotional mailing lists sold by credit reporting agencies. The system is an interactive voice mail that requests information necessary to opt out of such lists.

    Consumers should call (888) 5 OPT OUT and follow the voice prompt. Once the information is recorded, an e-mail is sent to the three bureaus daily and posted to consumer files. The number is available 24 hours a day.





    Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card to have.#What #is #the #best #credit #card #to #have

    Credit Cards

    Learn how the right credit card can become a power financial tool, from paying off debt faster to earning rewards and perks.

    What would you like to do?

    Credit Card Offers

    Payoff Calculator

    Credit Card Reviews

    Minimum Payment Calculator

    Editor’s Picks

    What is the best credit card to have

    Why 0% financing from retailers can be a bad deal

    What is the best credit card to have

    Should you use a balance transfer credit card to pay down debt?

    What is the best credit card to have

    4 tips to maximize your rewards credit cards

    What is the best credit card to have

    6 risky ways to pay off credit card debt

    What is the best credit card to have

    What credit score do you need for a premium rewards credit card?

    Latest Articles

    What is the best credit card to have

    Business Platinum Card from American Express vs. Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on the website are from companies from which this site receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this [. ]

    What is the best credit card to have

    U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

    Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

    Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Current Credit Card Interest Rates

    View current credit card rates based on Bankrate.com’s weekly national survey of large banks and thrifts.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

    Your annual credit card spending will determine which of these rewards cards is right for you.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Black Friday 2017: Find the best credit card strategy for you

    Using the right card can help you maximize rewards and save money while holiday shopping.

    What is the best credit card to have

    6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

    There are ways you can prevent a card closing, but sometimes it’s out of your control.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Uber’s new rewards credit card zooms ahead of the pack

    You may be floored by the souped-up rewards on dining and travel spending.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

    The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

    What is the best credit card to have

    Best credit card tips for November 2017

    These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

    RELATED TOPICS

    HELPFUL LINKS

    Maximize Your Money. Get Expert Advice Tools. Master Life’s Financial Journey.

    You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for four decades.

    Our tools, rates and advice help no matter where you are on life’s financial journey.

    How we make money

    Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.

    2017 Bankrate, LLC All Rights Reserved.





    Credit Cards – Compare Best Card Offers & Apply Online, Bankrate, what is the best credit card.#What #is #the #best #credit #card

    Compare partner credit card offers from our most

    Cash Back

    Balance Transfer

    Business Card

    Cards for Bad Credit

    What is the best credit card

    When looking to get a credit card, there are a variety of things you should consider. If you want a rewards card to use frequently, you might not mind paying a $100 or $200 annual fee. You should also consider the regular APR (as opposed to the introductory rate) and the interest rate. A good interest rate is dependent on how you will use the card. For example, a 20% interest rate is fine if you plan on paying off the balance every month.

    It pays to ask these kinds of questions before you fill out the application form. Here are 9 questions you want answered before you sign on the dotted line.

    The “very first question” the consumer should ask is, “Why am I applying for this card? Why do I need this card?” says Bruce McClary, media director for ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling

    Some positive reasons: The card has low or no fees, a lower interest rate or offers a rewards program that suits your spending habits. “It has to make sense, and it has to fit into your overall lifestyle,” McClary says.

    Do you pay off your credit card balances every month? If so, “you don’t care what the interest rate is because you won’t pay any,” says Ric Edelman, author of “The Truth About Money.” “But you care about the (annual) fee,” he says.

    If you run a balance, you want the lowest rate you can get, even if that comes with an annual fee.

    One clue to your usage: “Look at your past history,” says Edelman. “Because what you’ve done before is what you will be doing.”

    If you’re shopping for a card, chances are you’re comparing card terms. But if an issuer sends you an offer, it’s tempting to apply and see what you get.

    “It’s really difficult to pick one (in isolation),” says Kelly Rogers, chief development officer for the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County and adjunct faculty at Chapman University. “If someone just shows you one car, how do you know if it’s the right car for you?”

    Her advice: Do a side-by-side comparison of several different cards before you apply.

    Don’t be afraid to plug the card name, “complaints” and “customer service” into your favorite search engine. “I go through and see who has the least amount of complaints and issues,” says Rogers.

    Some cards will give you a range of rates you could get, but often that window is pretty wide, says Nick Bourke, director of the Safe Credit Card Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Other cards may offer a specific rate (or terms) and either approve or reject you.

    If you’re operating totally in the dark, you have another option: Apply by phone and push for an answer on your rate and credit line before the account is opened.

    While there are no guarantees, sometimes you can get an answer, says Bourke.

    “I’ve actually done this myself,” he says, admitting “you do have to go pretty far in the process.”

    You may have to ask for the department that’s actually evaluating your application to get an answer, he says.

    “The thing that you want to do is when you’re talking to the person on the phone taking your application is you want to push them as hard as you can to get your APR and credit line,” Bourke says. Then, once you have the information and before the account is opened in your name, “you can say yes or no at that point,” he says.

    According to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, if a card offers a lower interest rate during an introductory period, the promotional rate has to last at least six months. While that introductory offer may be appealing, the regular rate is what you’re really buying.

    So find out when the introductory APR expires and what the new rate will be. You can find this information online in the terms and conditions for the card or you can ask a service representative.

    Another smart question: How long is that grace period? “Some cards start charging interest immediately,” says Edelman. A card can have different grace periods for balance transfers and cash advances than it does for purchases.

    You can find information about the grace period in the credit card offer, thanks to federal rules that took effect in 2010. Look for a summary table of rate and fee disclosures, which will include a statement that explains how to avoid paying interest.

    If you’re getting the card for points or rewards, this is one you definitely need to ask, says Josh Frank, senior researcher with the Center for Responsible Lending. Some issuers will revoke rewards if you’re late with a payment by even one day, he says.

    “A lot of times, the answer they will give you is that they can take away or reduce your rewards for any reason,” he says. While that’s true, the issuer will have a policy on revoking or reducing points, and that’s what you want to ask about, he says. Under what specific circumstances would they reduce or eliminate a customer’s points?

    In most cases, “this is one the customer service agent should know the answer to,” he says.

    Some card issuers use your purchase records to assess your ongoing creditworthiness.

    That means if you suddenly use your card to purchase retread tires, pay for a session with a marriage counselor or make a purchase at a market on a sketchy side of town, you could see your APR climb or your credit limit fall, says Frank. If you see this practice as an invasion of privacy, ask beforehand if the issuer does this, he says.

    How to phrase it: Can my transactions ever be used in rating my credit risk?

    And that’s one question the customer service representative “might not know the answer to,” says Frank. “You might want to ask them to transfer you to the credit department manager.”

    If you are guaranteeing a card account by co-signing for a college student, ask if you will be on the hook for the debt after the other party turns 21, says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center.

    Many times, “there is nothing to prevent the issuers from saying you’re going to be guaranteeing this card 15 years from now — long after junior is out of college,” she says.

    In addition, find out exactly what has to be done to get you off the account. Are you free to complete those steps yourself? Or will you need the cooperation of someone who might not want you — and those charging privileges — to go away?

    Federal regulations limit your liability for unauthorized credit card charges to $50 if you report it within two business days. The longer you wait, the more you may lose. Many issuers cap losses at zero dollars, provided you follow a few rules. So find out how the card would handle charges you didn’t make, says McClary.

    Also, does the issuer monitor usage and shut down the card if it sees out-of-the-ordinary charges or spending locations? That feature can be great if you always use the card for the same types of purchases in the same geographic area, but cumbersome if you’re getting the card for travel.

    While it sounds counterproductive, you want to ask some detailed questions on how the issuer will treat you if you run into financial problems, says McClary.

    Will you lose points or benefits? Will you be hit with late fees or a penalty rate? Ask what those penalties are or look online at the terms and conditions for the card.

    Some issuers have programs to slash interest temporarily for customers who get behind, he says. Others don’t. So find out ahead of time what kind of programs the issuer offers that will help you rehabilitate your account and restore your original terms, McClary says.

    Ask about the “worst case scenario,” he says. “When do they consider an account to be charged off? And when do they send an account to a collection agency?”

    “It may be a little tough to get a hold of that information because it might not be readily available at the customer service level,” says McClary. “You may have to punch it up a level.”





    Credit Cards – Compare Best Card Offers & Apply Online, Bankrate, what is the best credit card to have.#What #is #the #best #credit #card #to #have

    Compare partner credit card offers from our most

    Cash Back

    Balance Transfer

    Business Card

    Cards for Bad Credit

    What is the best credit card to have

    When looking to get a credit card, there are a variety of things you should consider. If you want a rewards card to use frequently, you might not mind paying a $100 or $200 annual fee. You should also consider the regular APR (as opposed to the introductory rate) and the interest rate. A good interest rate is dependent on how you will use the card. For example, a 20% interest rate is fine if you plan on paying off the balance every month.

    It pays to ask these kinds of questions before you fill out the application form. Here are 9 questions you want answered before you sign on the dotted line.

    The “very first question” the consumer should ask is, “Why am I applying for this card? Why do I need this card?” says Bruce McClary, media director for ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling

    Some positive reasons: The card has low or no fees, a lower interest rate or offers a rewards program that suits your spending habits. “It has to make sense, and it has to fit into your overall lifestyle,” McClary says.

    Do you pay off your credit card balances every month? If so, “you don’t care what the interest rate is because you won’t pay any,” says Ric Edelman, author of “The Truth About Money.” “But you care about the (annual) fee,” he says.

    If you run a balance, you want the lowest rate you can get, even if that comes with an annual fee.

    One clue to your usage: “Look at your past history,” says Edelman. “Because what you’ve done before is what you will be doing.”

    If you’re shopping for a card, chances are you’re comparing card terms. But if an issuer sends you an offer, it’s tempting to apply and see what you get.

    “It’s really difficult to pick one (in isolation),” says Kelly Rogers, chief development officer for the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County and adjunct faculty at Chapman University. “If someone just shows you one car, how do you know if it’s the right car for you?”

    Her advice: Do a side-by-side comparison of several different cards before you apply.

    Don’t be afraid to plug the card name, “complaints” and “customer service” into your favorite search engine. “I go through and see who has the least amount of complaints and issues,” says Rogers.

    Some cards will give you a range of rates you could get, but often that window is pretty wide, says Nick Bourke, director of the Safe Credit Card Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Other cards may offer a specific rate (or terms) and either approve or reject you.

    If you’re operating totally in the dark, you have another option: Apply by phone and push for an answer on your rate and credit line before the account is opened.

    While there are no guarantees, sometimes you can get an answer, says Bourke.

    “I’ve actually done this myself,” he says, admitting “you do have to go pretty far in the process.”

    You may have to ask for the department that’s actually evaluating your application to get an answer, he says.

    “The thing that you want to do is when you’re talking to the person on the phone taking your application is you want to push them as hard as you can to get your APR and credit line,” Bourke says. Then, once you have the information and before the account is opened in your name, “you can say yes or no at that point,” he says.

    According to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, if a card offers a lower interest rate during an introductory period, the promotional rate has to last at least six months. While that introductory offer may be appealing, the regular rate is what you’re really buying.

    So find out when the introductory APR expires and what the new rate will be. You can find this information online in the terms and conditions for the card or you can ask a service representative.

    Another smart question: How long is that grace period? “Some cards start charging interest immediately,” says Edelman. A card can have different grace periods for balance transfers and cash advances than it does for purchases.

    You can find information about the grace period in the credit card offer, thanks to federal rules that took effect in 2010. Look for a summary table of rate and fee disclosures, which will include a statement that explains how to avoid paying interest.

    If you’re getting the card for points or rewards, this is one you definitely need to ask, says Josh Frank, senior researcher with the Center for Responsible Lending. Some issuers will revoke rewards if you’re late with a payment by even one day, he says.

    “A lot of times, the answer they will give you is that they can take away or reduce your rewards for any reason,” he says. While that’s true, the issuer will have a policy on revoking or reducing points, and that’s what you want to ask about, he says. Under what specific circumstances would they reduce or eliminate a customer’s points?

    In most cases, “this is one the customer service agent should know the answer to,” he says.

    Some card issuers use your purchase records to assess your ongoing creditworthiness.

    That means if you suddenly use your card to purchase retread tires, pay for a session with a marriage counselor or make a purchase at a market on a sketchy side of town, you could see your APR climb or your credit limit fall, says Frank. If you see this practice as an invasion of privacy, ask beforehand if the issuer does this, he says.

    How to phrase it: Can my transactions ever be used in rating my credit risk?

    And that’s one question the customer service representative “might not know the answer to,” says Frank. “You might want to ask them to transfer you to the credit department manager.”

    If you are guaranteeing a card account by co-signing for a college student, ask if you will be on the hook for the debt after the other party turns 21, says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center.

    Many times, “there is nothing to prevent the issuers from saying you’re going to be guaranteeing this card 15 years from now — long after junior is out of college,” she says.

    In addition, find out exactly what has to be done to get you off the account. Are you free to complete those steps yourself? Or will you need the cooperation of someone who might not want you — and those charging privileges — to go away?

    Federal regulations limit your liability for unauthorized credit card charges to $50 if you report it within two business days. The longer you wait, the more you may lose. Many issuers cap losses at zero dollars, provided you follow a few rules. So find out how the card would handle charges you didn’t make, says McClary.

    Also, does the issuer monitor usage and shut down the card if it sees out-of-the-ordinary charges or spending locations? That feature can be great if you always use the card for the same types of purchases in the same geographic area, but cumbersome if you’re getting the card for travel.

    While it sounds counterproductive, you want to ask some detailed questions on how the issuer will treat you if you run into financial problems, says McClary.

    Will you lose points or benefits? Will you be hit with late fees or a penalty rate? Ask what those penalties are or look online at the terms and conditions for the card.

    Some issuers have programs to slash interest temporarily for customers who get behind, he says. Others don’t. So find out ahead of time what kind of programs the issuer offers that will help you rehabilitate your account and restore your original terms, McClary says.

    Ask about the “worst case scenario,” he says. “When do they consider an account to be charged off? And when do they send an account to a collection agency?”

    “It may be a little tough to get a hold of that information because it might not be readily available at the customer service level,” says McClary. “You may have to punch it up a level.”





    Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card to have.#What #is #the #best #credit #card #to #have

    Credit Cards

    Learn how the right credit card can become a power financial tool, from paying off debt faster to earning rewards and perks.

    What would you like to do?

    Credit Card Offers

    Payoff Calculator

    Credit Card Reviews

    Minimum Payment Calculator

    Editor’s Picks

    What is the best credit card to have

    Why 0% financing from retailers can be a bad deal

    What is the best credit card to have

    Should you use a balance transfer credit card to pay down debt?

    What is the best credit card to have

    4 tips to maximize your rewards credit cards

    What is the best credit card to have

    6 risky ways to pay off credit card debt

    What is the best credit card to have

    What credit score do you need for a premium rewards credit card?

    Latest Articles

    What is the best credit card to have

    Business Platinum Card from American Express vs. Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on the website are from companies from which this site receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this [. ]

    What is the best credit card to have

    U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

    Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

    Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Current Credit Card Interest Rates

    View current credit card rates based on Bankrate.com’s weekly national survey of large banks and thrifts.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

    Your annual credit card spending will determine which of these rewards cards is right for you.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Black Friday 2017: Find the best credit card strategy for you

    Using the right card can help you maximize rewards and save money while holiday shopping.

    What is the best credit card to have

    6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

    There are ways you can prevent a card closing, but sometimes it’s out of your control.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Uber’s new rewards credit card zooms ahead of the pack

    You may be floored by the souped-up rewards on dining and travel spending.

    What is the best credit card to have

    Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

    The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

    What is the best credit card to have

    Best credit card tips for November 2017

    These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

    RELATED TOPICS

    HELPFUL LINKS

    Maximize Your Money. Get Expert Advice Tools. Master Life’s Financial Journey.

    You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for four decades.

    Our tools, rates and advice help no matter where you are on life’s financial journey.

    How we make money

    Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.

    2017 Bankrate, LLC All Rights Reserved.





    Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card.#What #is #the #best #credit #card

    Credit Cards

    Learn how the right credit card can become a power financial tool, from paying off debt faster to earning rewards and perks.

    What would you like to do?

    Credit Card Offers

    Payoff Calculator

    Credit Card Reviews

    Minimum Payment Calculator

    Editor’s Picks

    What is the best credit card

    Why 0% financing from retailers can be a bad deal

    What is the best credit card

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    Credit Cards – Our Best 0% Credit Card Deals, the limited credit card.#The #limited #credit #card

    Compare credit cards

    Whatever type of credit card you’re

    looking for our Smart Search can help:

    We’ll show you cards likely to say YES

    Searching WON’T harm your credit score

    Fast and easy to use

    Compare credit cards

    Compare more than 100 credit cards instantly and find top deals on: 0%

    balance transfers, 0% purchases, cashback and rewards. Plus get exclusive deals you

    can’t get anywhere else.

    Why should I use Smart Search

    Using Smart Search makes you less likely to be one of the millions of people who get declined for credit cards every year. Smart Search shows you which cards you’re most likely to be accepted for, so you can avoid the ones that are more likely to decline you. Getting declined can damage your credit score, and this makes it harder to borrow money in the future.

    How does it work?

    Why do I have to give you my personal information?

    How long does it take?

    Why can’t I just look at a list of cards?

    Credit cards. Trust us to explain them simply

    EXPLORE

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    Credit cards come in all shapes sizes, finding one that suits you can make a world of difference to your pocket.

    What type of credit card is best for me

    A credit card can be a useful addition to any wallet, purse or pocket. Find out what type of card will suit you best.

    What is a balance transfer

    Find out more about how balance transfer credit cards work and what s available.

    Guide to credit card protection

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    Can’t find what you’re looking for? Try looking at our news, views and in-depth credit cards guides

    Credit card companies

    Ready to look at credit cards?

    Frequently asked questions

    It’s hard to imagine life without a credit card as these days you can use them almost anywhere, anytime. Perhaps you want to splash out in the sales, treat your family to a holiday or maybe indulge in some online shopping. There’s no doubt that credit cards can be a quick and easy way to pay for a wide range of goods and services. Plus, you can spread the cost over several months, allowing you to budget. But picking the right credit card can be confusing as there are so many different deals on the market. Our guide explains how credit cards work – and how to select the right card for you.

    What is a credit card?

    A credit card is basically a loan, but if you clear your balance in full when you receive your monthly statement, the loan is interest free. If you can’t afford to pay off the outstanding debt, you can make monthly payments, but you will normally be charged interest. The rates vary, but 19% is typical.

    Credit card comparison

    When using our credit card comparison tool, decide what you are going to use the card for. You can choose between balance transfer cards, purchase cards, money transfer cards, cards that reward your spending and cards to use abroad

    • 0% purchase cards: enable you to buy items upfront, while paying off the amount you’ve spent over a stated period without incurring any interest charges.
    • Balance transfer cards: enable you to transfer an existing credit card balance to a new card that charges less interest.
    • Reward cards: – these cards offer cashback or loyalty points.

    If you want to use a card for shopping, there’s little point in applying for a 0% balance transfer rate. Shoppers should search for a deal that offers a low rate on purchases. Some cards, for example, charge 0% on purchases for a number of months, and they can be a cost effective way to pay for a big ticket item, such as a washing machine or sofa. If you clear the debt before the 0% deal expires, you will pay no interest whatsoever.

    Low rate cards are better suited to people who are not able to pay their balance in full each month. There is no introductory interest rate offer. Instead, you will pay a relatively low rate of interest for as long as it takes to clear your debt.

    People who have run up debts on another card or cards at a high rate of interest can save money with a balance transfer deal. Let’s say you have accumulated debts of £3000 on a card that charges interest at 19%. If you switch the outstanding balance to a card that charges 0% interest for 24 months, you can instantly cut the cost of your debt.

    Reward cards are ideal if you pay off your balance every month as the interest rate is irrelevant. You can therefore look out for a card that offers cashback or loyalty points.

    There are also various deals available for people who take their credit card abroad and for those who have a poor credit history.

    Pros and cons of credit cards

    Credit cards can be a great way to pay for goods and services without having to stump up the money upfront. You can even use your credit card like an interest-free loan, allowing you to borrow money for free. You also get some protection under the Consumer Credit Act if you buy something with a credit card.

    But let’s not forget that it’s easy to run up expensive debts with a credit card, especially if you pay off only the minimum balance each month. You can also get into financial difficulty if you don’t stick to the rules. For example, most companies charge a penalty if you miss a payment, make a late payment or breach your credit limit. Bear in mind, too, that most issuers reserve their best deals for people with a spotless credit record, so your application could be turned down.

    Find the right credit card

    The best credit card for you depends on whether you will pay off your balance each month and how you intend to use the card. Smart Search will ask you a selection of questions to help determine which type of credit card best suits your needs, without leaving a mark on your credit file.

    There are hundreds of different credit card deals but you can compare all the leading offers quickly and easily with Moneysupermarket’s online service. So, whether you want to switch a balance or you are looking for a 0% deal on purchases, we have all the information you need at the click of a mouse.

    Moneysupermarket is a credit broker – this means we’ll show you products offered by lenders. We never take a fee from customers for this broking service. Instead we are usually paid a fee by the lenders – though the size of that payment doesn’t affect how we show products to customers.

    The limited credit card





    Credit Cards – Compare Best Card Offers & Apply Online, Bankrate, the best credit card.#The #best #credit #card

    Compare partner credit card offers from our most

    Cash Back

    Balance Transfer

    Business Card

    Cards for Bad Credit

    The best credit card

    When looking to get a credit card, there are a variety of things you should consider. If you want a rewards card to use frequently, you might not mind paying a $100 or $200 annual fee. You should also consider the regular APR (as opposed to the introductory rate) and the interest rate. A good interest rate is dependent on how you will use the card. For example, a 20% interest rate is fine if you plan on paying off the balance every month.

    It pays to ask these kinds of questions before you fill out the application form. Here are 9 questions you want answered before you sign on the dotted line.

    The “very first question” the consumer should ask is, “Why am I applying for this card? Why do I need this card?” says Bruce McClary, media director for ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling

    Some positive reasons: The card has low or no fees, a lower interest rate or offers a rewards program that suits your spending habits. “It has to make sense, and it has to fit into your overall lifestyle,” McClary says.

    Do you pay off your credit card balances every month? If so, “you don’t care what the interest rate is because you won’t pay any,” says Ric Edelman, author of “The Truth About Money.” “But you care about the (annual) fee,” he says.

    If you run a balance, you want the lowest rate you can get, even if that comes with an annual fee.

    One clue to your usage: “Look at your past history,” says Edelman. “Because what you’ve done before is what you will be doing.”

    If you’re shopping for a card, chances are you’re comparing card terms. But if an issuer sends you an offer, it’s tempting to apply and see what you get.

    “It’s really difficult to pick one (in isolation),” says Kelly Rogers, chief development officer for the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County and adjunct faculty at Chapman University. “If someone just shows you one car, how do you know if it’s the right car for you?”

    Her advice: Do a side-by-side comparison of several different cards before you apply.

    Don’t be afraid to plug the card name, “complaints” and “customer service” into your favorite search engine. “I go through and see who has the least amount of complaints and issues,” says Rogers.

    Some cards will give you a range of rates you could get, but often that window is pretty wide, says Nick Bourke, director of the Safe Credit Card Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Other cards may offer a specific rate (or terms) and either approve or reject you.

    If you’re operating totally in the dark, you have another option: Apply by phone and push for an answer on your rate and credit line before the account is opened.

    While there are no guarantees, sometimes you can get an answer, says Bourke.

    “I’ve actually done this myself,” he says, admitting “you do have to go pretty far in the process.”

    You may have to ask for the department that’s actually evaluating your application to get an answer, he says.

    “The thing that you want to do is when you’re talking to the person on the phone taking your application is you want to push them as hard as you can to get your APR and credit line,” Bourke says. Then, once you have the information and before the account is opened in your name, “you can say yes or no at that point,” he says.

    According to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, if a card offers a lower interest rate during an introductory period, the promotional rate has to last at least six months. While that introductory offer may be appealing, the regular rate is what you’re really buying.

    So find out when the introductory APR expires and what the new rate will be. You can find this information online in the terms and conditions for the card or you can ask a service representative.

    Another smart question: How long is that grace period? “Some cards start charging interest immediately,” says Edelman. A card can have different grace periods for balance transfers and cash advances than it does for purchases.

    You can find information about the grace period in the credit card offer, thanks to federal rules that took effect in 2010. Look for a summary table of rate and fee disclosures, which will include a statement that explains how to avoid paying interest.

    If you’re getting the card for points or rewards, this is one you definitely need to ask, says Josh Frank, senior researcher with the Center for Responsible Lending. Some issuers will revoke rewards if you’re late with a payment by even one day, he says.

    “A lot of times, the answer they will give you is that they can take away or reduce your rewards for any reason,” he says. While that’s true, the issuer will have a policy on revoking or reducing points, and that’s what you want to ask about, he says. Under what specific circumstances would they reduce or eliminate a customer’s points?

    In most cases, “this is one the customer service agent should know the answer to,” he says.

    Some card issuers use your purchase records to assess your ongoing creditworthiness.

    That means if you suddenly use your card to purchase retread tires, pay for a session with a marriage counselor or make a purchase at a market on a sketchy side of town, you could see your APR climb or your credit limit fall, says Frank. If you see this practice as an invasion of privacy, ask beforehand if the issuer does this, he says.

    How to phrase it: Can my transactions ever be used in rating my credit risk?

    And that’s one question the customer service representative “might not know the answer to,” says Frank. “You might want to ask them to transfer you to the credit department manager.”

    If you are guaranteeing a card account by co-signing for a college student, ask if you will be on the hook for the debt after the other party turns 21, says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center.

    Many times, “there is nothing to prevent the issuers from saying you’re going to be guaranteeing this card 15 years from now — long after junior is out of college,” she says.

    In addition, find out exactly what has to be done to get you off the account. Are you free to complete those steps yourself? Or will you need the cooperation of someone who might not want you — and those charging privileges — to go away?

    Federal regulations limit your liability for unauthorized credit card charges to $50 if you report it within two business days. The longer you wait, the more you may lose. Many issuers cap losses at zero dollars, provided you follow a few rules. So find out how the card would handle charges you didn’t make, says McClary.

    Also, does the issuer monitor usage and shut down the card if it sees out-of-the-ordinary charges or spending locations? That feature can be great if you always use the card for the same types of purchases in the same geographic area, but cumbersome if you’re getting the card for travel.

    While it sounds counterproductive, you want to ask some detailed questions on how the issuer will treat you if you run into financial problems, says McClary.

    Will you lose points or benefits? Will you be hit with late fees or a penalty rate? Ask what those penalties are or look online at the terms and conditions for the card.

    Some issuers have programs to slash interest temporarily for customers who get behind, he says. Others don’t. So find out ahead of time what kind of programs the issuer offers that will help you rehabilitate your account and restore your original terms, McClary says.

    Ask about the “worst case scenario,” he says. “When do they consider an account to be charged off? And when do they send an account to a collection agency?”

    “It may be a little tough to get a hold of that information because it might not be readily available at the customer service level,” says McClary. “You may have to punch it up a level.”





    Credit Cards – Compare Best Card Offers & Apply Online, Bankrate, the best credit card.#The #best #credit #card

    Compare partner credit card offers from our most

    Cash Back

    Balance Transfer

    Business Card

    Cards for Bad Credit

    The best credit card

    When looking to get a credit card, there are a variety of things you should consider. If you want a rewards card to use frequently, you might not mind paying a $100 or $200 annual fee. You should also consider the regular APR (as opposed to the introductory rate) and the interest rate. A good interest rate is dependent on how you will use the card. For example, a 20% interest rate is fine if you plan on paying off the balance every month.

    It pays to ask these kinds of questions before you fill out the application form. Here are 9 questions you want answered before you sign on the dotted line.

    The “very first question” the consumer should ask is, “Why am I applying for this card? Why do I need this card?” says Bruce McClary, media director for ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling

    Some positive reasons: The card has low or no fees, a lower interest rate or offers a rewards program that suits your spending habits. “It has to make sense, and it has to fit into your overall lifestyle,” McClary says.

    Do you pay off your credit card balances every month? If so, “you don’t care what the interest rate is because you won’t pay any,” says Ric Edelman, author of “The Truth About Money.” “But you care about the (annual) fee,” he says.

    If you run a balance, you want the lowest rate you can get, even if that comes with an annual fee.

    One clue to your usage: “Look at your past history,” says Edelman. “Because what you’ve done before is what you will be doing.”

    If you’re shopping for a card, chances are you’re comparing card terms. But if an issuer sends you an offer, it’s tempting to apply and see what you get.

    “It’s really difficult to pick one (in isolation),” says Kelly Rogers, chief development officer for the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County and adjunct faculty at Chapman University. “If someone just shows you one car, how do you know if it’s the right car for you?”

    Her advice: Do a side-by-side comparison of several different cards before you apply.

    Don’t be afraid to plug the card name, “complaints” and “customer service” into your favorite search engine. “I go through and see who has the least amount of complaints and issues,” says Rogers.

    Some cards will give you a range of rates you could get, but often that window is pretty wide, says Nick Bourke, director of the Safe Credit Card Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Other cards may offer a specific rate (or terms) and either approve or reject you.

    If you’re operating totally in the dark, you have another option: Apply by phone and push for an answer on your rate and credit line before the account is opened.

    While there are no guarantees, sometimes you can get an answer, says Bourke.

    “I’ve actually done this myself,” he says, admitting “you do have to go pretty far in the process.”

    You may have to ask for the department that’s actually evaluating your application to get an answer, he says.

    “The thing that you want to do is when you’re talking to the person on the phone taking your application is you want to push them as hard as you can to get your APR and credit line,” Bourke says. Then, once you have the information and before the account is opened in your name, “you can say yes or no at that point,” he says.

    According to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, if a card offers a lower interest rate during an introductory period, the promotional rate has to last at least six months. While that introductory offer may be appealing, the regular rate is what you’re really buying.

    So find out when the introductory APR expires and what the new rate will be. You can find this information online in the terms and conditions for the card or you can ask a service representative.

    Another smart question: How long is that grace period? “Some cards start charging interest immediately,” says Edelman. A card can have different grace periods for balance transfers and cash advances than it does for purchases.

    You can find information about the grace period in the credit card offer, thanks to federal rules that took effect in 2010. Look for a summary table of rate and fee disclosures, which will include a statement that explains how to avoid paying interest.

    If you’re getting the card for points or rewards, this is one you definitely need to ask, says Josh Frank, senior researcher with the Center for Responsible Lending. Some issuers will revoke rewards if you’re late with a payment by even one day, he says.

    “A lot of times, the answer they will give you is that they can take away or reduce your rewards for any reason,” he says. While that’s true, the issuer will have a policy on revoking or reducing points, and that’s what you want to ask about, he says. Under what specific circumstances would they reduce or eliminate a customer’s points?

    In most cases, “this is one the customer service agent should know the answer to,” he says.

    Some card issuers use your purchase records to assess your ongoing creditworthiness.

    That means if you suddenly use your card to purchase retread tires, pay for a session with a marriage counselor or make a purchase at a market on a sketchy side of town, you could see your APR climb or your credit limit fall, says Frank. If you see this practice as an invasion of privacy, ask beforehand if the issuer does this, he says.

    How to phrase it: Can my transactions ever be used in rating my credit risk?

    And that’s one question the customer service representative “might not know the answer to,” says Frank. “You might want to ask them to transfer you to the credit department manager.”

    If you are guaranteeing a card account by co-signing for a college student, ask if you will be on the hook for the debt after the other party turns 21, says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center.

    Many times, “there is nothing to prevent the issuers from saying you’re going to be guaranteeing this card 15 years from now — long after junior is out of college,” she says.

    In addition, find out exactly what has to be done to get you off the account. Are you free to complete those steps yourself? Or will you need the cooperation of someone who might not want you — and those charging privileges — to go away?

    Federal regulations limit your liability for unauthorized credit card charges to $50 if you report it within two business days. The longer you wait, the more you may lose. Many issuers cap losses at zero dollars, provided you follow a few rules. So find out how the card would handle charges you didn’t make, says McClary.

    Also, does the issuer monitor usage and shut down the card if it sees out-of-the-ordinary charges or spending locations? That feature can be great if you always use the card for the same types of purchases in the same geographic area, but cumbersome if you’re getting the card for travel.

    While it sounds counterproductive, you want to ask some detailed questions on how the issuer will treat you if you run into financial problems, says McClary.

    Will you lose points or benefits? Will you be hit with late fees or a penalty rate? Ask what those penalties are or look online at the terms and conditions for the card.

    Some issuers have programs to slash interest temporarily for customers who get behind, he says. Others don’t. So find out ahead of time what kind of programs the issuer offers that will help you rehabilitate your account and restore your original terms, McClary says.

    Ask about the “worst case scenario,” he says. “When do they consider an account to be charged off? And when do they send an account to a collection agency?”

    “It may be a little tough to get a hold of that information because it might not be readily available at the customer service level,” says McClary. “You may have to punch it up a level.”





    Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), the fair credit reporting act.#The #fair #credit #reporting #act

    Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)

    Para informacion en espanol, visite www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore o escribe a la Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20552.

    A Summary of Your Rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act

    The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) promotes the accuracy, fairness, and privacy of information in the files of consumer reporting agencies. There are many types of consumer reporting agencies, including credit bureaus and specialty agencies (such as agencies that sell information about check writing histories, medical records, and rental history records). Here is a summary of your major rights under the FCRA. For more information, including information about additional rights, go to www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore or write to: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20552.

    You must be told if information in your file has been used against you. Anyone who uses a credit report or another type of consumer report to deny your application for credit, insurance, or employment or to take another adverse action against you must tell you, and must give you the name, address, and phone number of the agency that provided the information.

    You have the right to know what is in your file. You may request and obtain all the information about you in the files of a consumer reporting agency (your file disclosure ). You will be required to provide proper identification, which may include your Social Security number. In many cases, the disclosure will be free. You are entitled to a free file disclosure if:

    • a person has taken adverse action against you because of information in your credit report;
    • you are the victim of identity theft and place a fraud alert in your file;
    • your file contains inaccurate information as a result of fraud;
    • you are on public assistance;
    • you are unemployed but expect to apply for employment within 60 days.

    In addition, all consumers are entitled to one free disclosure every 12 months upon request from each nationwide credit bureau and from nationwide specialty consumer reporting agencies. See www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore for additional information.

    You have the right to ask for a credit score. Credit scores are numerical summaries of your creditworthiness based on information from credit bureaus. You may request a credit score from consumer reporting agencies that create scores or distribute scores used in residential real property loans, but you will have to pay for it. In some mortgage transactions, you will receive credit score information for free from the mortgage lender.

    You have the right to dispute incomplete or inaccurate information. If you identify information in your file that is incomplete or inaccurate, and report it to the consumer reporting agency, the agency must investigate unless your dispute is frivolous. See www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore for an explanation of dispute procedures.

    Consumer reporting agencies must correct or delete inaccurate, incomplete, or unverifiable information. Inaccurate, incomplete or unverifiable information must be removed or corrected, usually within 30 days. However, a consumer reporting agency may continue to report information it has verified as accurate.

    Consumer reporting agencies may not report outdated negative information. In most cases, a consumer reporting agency may not report negative information that is more than seven years old, or bankruptcies that are more than 10 years old.

    Access to your file is limited. A consumer reporting agency may provide information about you only to people with a valid need usually to consider an application with a creditor, insurer, employer, landlord, or other business. The FCRA specifies those with a valid need for access.

    You must give your consent for reports to be provided to employers. A consumer reporting agency may not give out information about you to your employer, or a potential employer, without your written consent given to the employer. Written consent generally is not required in the trucking industry. For more information, go to www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore.

    You may limit prescreened offers of credit and insurance you get based on information in your credit report. Unsolicited prescreened offers for credit and insurance must include a toll-free phone number you can call if you choose to remove your name and address from the lists these offers are based on. You may opt-out with the nationwide credit bureaus at 1 888 5OPTOUT (1 888 567 8688).

    You may seek damages from violators. If a consumer reporting agency, or, in some cases, a user of consumer reports or a furnisher of information to a consumer reporting agency violates the FCRA, you may be able to sue in state or federal court.

    Identity theft victims and active duty military personnel have additional rights. For more Information, visit www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore.

    States may enforce the FCRA, and many states have their own consumer reporting laws. In some cases, you may have more rights under state law. For more information, contact your state or local consumer protection agency or your state Attorney General. For more information about your federal rights, contact:

    1.a. Banks, savings associations, and credit unions with total assets of over $10 billion and their affiliates.

    b. Such affiliates that are not banks, savings associations, or credit unions also should list in addition to the Bureau:

    a. Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection

    1700 G Street NW

    Washington, DC 20552

    b. Federal Trade Commission: Consumer Response Center – FCRA Washington, DC 20580

    2. To the extent not included in item 1 above:

    a. National banks, federal savings associations, and federal branches and federal agencies of foreign banks

    b. State member banks, branches and agencies of foreign banks (other than federal branches, federal agencies, and insured state branches of foreign banks), commercial lending companies owned or controlled by foreign banks, and organizations operating under section 25 or 25A of the Federal Reserve Act

    c. Nonmember Insured banks, Insured State Branches of Foreign Banks, and insured state savings associations

    a. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

    Customer Assistance Group

    1301 McKinney Street, Suite 3450

    Houston, TX 77010-9050

    b. Federal Reserve Consumer Help Center

    Minneapolis, MN 55480

    c. FDIC Consumer Response Center

    1100 Walnut Street, Box #11

    Kansas City, MO 64106

    d. National Credit Union Administration

    Office of Consumer Protection (OCP)

    Division of Consumer Compliance and Outreach (DCCO)

    1775 Duke Street

    Alexandria, VA 22314

    Asst. General Counsel for Aviation Enforcement Proceedings

    Aviation Consumer Protection Division

    Department of Transportation

    1200 New Jersey Avenue SE

    Washington, DC 20590

    4. Creditors Subject to Surface Transportation Board

    Office of Proceedings, Surface Transportation Board

    Department of Transportation

    395 E Street, SW

    Washington, DC 20423

    5. Creditors Subject to Packers and Stockyards Act

    Nearest Packers and Stockyards Administration area supervisor

    6. Small Business Investment Companies

    Associate Deputy Administrator for Capital Access

    United States Small Business Administration

    409 Third Street, SW, 8th Floor

    Washington, DC 20416

    Securities and Exchange Commission

    Washington, DC 20549

    8. Federal Land Banks, Federal Land Bank Associations, Federal Intermediate Credit Banks, and Production Credit Associations

    Farm Credit Administration

    1501 Farm Credit Drive

    McLean, VA 22102-5090

    9. Retailers, Finance Companies, and All Other Creditors Not Listed Above

    FTC Regional Office for region in which the creditor operates or Federal Trade Commission: Consumer Response Center FCRA

    Washington, DC 20580

    Notification of Rights

    Review Your Free Experian Credit Report Today

    Good credit begins with knowing where your credit is today. Get started with your free Experian Credit Report, updated every 30 days on sign in. No credit card required.

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    Who can access my credit report? Do they have to have my permission? Is ther.

    I sent a debt validation letter to a collection agency and it’s been over .

    If I were denied credit recently, am I able to get a free copy of my credit .

    Can anyone obtain a credit report on anyone else if they are not a lending c.

    I was denied credit based on a credit report from Experian. Can I order a fr.





    A Layman s Guide to Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) – Credit Reporting, the fair credit reporting act.#The #fair #credit #reporting #act

    Layman’s Guide to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) by section:

    go to Section 605B.

  • Section 606В – One of the main point of this section on investigate consumer reports, like employment reports, is that there are required disclosures that must be made to consumers — go to Section 606.
  • Section 607В – Compliance section, which means that CRA’s must maintain reasonable procedures to avoid violating Section 604 and 605 of the Act, such as providing obsolete information or furnishing reports for non permitted purposes — go to Section 607.
  • Section 608В – When a government agency can see your report and what they can see — go to Section 608.
  • Section 609В – What must be disclosed to consumers upon request — go to Section 609.
  • Section 610В – To obtain your own report, consumers must provide identification, and disclosures must generally be in writing — go to Section 610.
  • Section 611В – Procedures when the consumer disputes the accuracy or completeness of an item in their file — go to Section 611.
  • Section 612В – Not all credit reports are free, some may incur a fee — go to Section 612.
  • Section 613В – CRA’s must be careful about furnishing public records for employment reports — go to Section 613.
  • Section 614В – Talks about investigative consumer reports and using information from an old report — go to Section 614.
  • Section 615В – Users and others who obtain consumer reports have important responsibilities — go to Section 615.
  • Section 616В – Dollar liability for those who willfully violate the Act — go to Section 616.
  • Section 617В – Liability for those who are negligent in failing to comply with the Act — Section 617.
  • Section 618В – Bring actions in US district courts within a specified time frame — go to Section 618.
  • Section 619В – Fines and potential imprisonment for obtaining information under false pretenses — go to Section 619.
  • Section 620В – Fines and potential imprisonment for the officers and employees of the CRA — go to Section 620.
  • Section 621В – The Federal Trade Commission is the main enforcer of the Act — Section 621.
  • Section 622В – Requirements regarding the reporting of overdue child support — go to Section 622.
  • Section 623В – Companies that report your credit information have important responsibilities — Section 623.
  • Section 624В – Governs affiliates who may have access to the report for marketing etc. — go to Section 624.
  • Section 625В – Does not exempt state laws except to extent state law is inconsistent with this law — go to Section 625.
  • Section 626В – The FBI has special rights to see your file — go to Section 626.
  • Section 627В – Counterterrorism has special rights to see your file — go to Section 627.
  • Section 628В – Properly dispose of consumer information to protect the confidentiality of the information — go to Section 628.
  • Section 629В – Prevents consumer reporting agencies from circumventing the law — Section 629.
  • The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is designed to help ensure that CRAs (Consumer Reporting Agencies, including credit bureaus and credit reporting companies) furnish correct and complete information to businesses to use when evaluating your application for credit, or insurance, or to employers or prospective employers.

    Your rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act include:

    • You have the right to receive a copy of your credit report. The copy of your report must contain all of the information in your file at the time of your request.
    • If you contest the completeness or accuracy of information in your report, you may file a dispute with the CRA and with the company that furnished the information to the CRA. Genrally both the CRA and the furnisher of information are legally obligated to reinvestigate your dispute as long as it is not frivolous.
    • CRA’s must correct or remove inaccurate, incomplete or unverifiable information in their files. CRA’s must remove obsolete information in their files.
    • If you are a victim of identity theft or are on active duty with the militar, you have more rights under the FCRA.
    • Only those with a permitted purpose or with your express permission may access your file.
    • Generally employers must have your express written permision to obtain your report.
    • Any company that denies your application, or takes an adverse action against you, based on information obtained from a CRA, must inform you of the adverse action and must supply you with the name and address of the CRA they used.
    • You have the right to a free copy of your credit report in numerous instances including when your application for credit or employment is adversely affected because of information supplied by the CRA. You can get a free credit report each year in any case.
    • You may opt-out of lists provided by the national credit bureaus that are based on your credit file.
    • You may sue under the FCRA for violations of the Act.
    • Credit scores are available to you on request from from mortgage credit agencies and sometimes from mortgage lenders. There may be a fee for the score.




    A Layman s Guide to Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) – Credit Reporting, what is the fair credit reporting act.#What #is #the #fair #credit #reporting #act

    Layman’s Guide to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) by section:

    go to Section 605B.

  • Section 606В – One of the main point of this section on investigate consumer reports, like employment reports, is that there are required disclosures that must be made to consumers — go to Section 606.
  • Section 607В – Compliance section, which means that CRA’s must maintain reasonable procedures to avoid violating Section 604 and 605 of the Act, such as providing obsolete information or furnishing reports for non permitted purposes — go to Section 607.
  • Section 608В – When a government agency can see your report and what they can see — go to Section 608.
  • Section 609В – What must be disclosed to consumers upon request — go to Section 609.
  • Section 610В – To obtain your own report, consumers must provide identification, and disclosures must generally be in writing — go to Section 610.
  • Section 611В – Procedures when the consumer disputes the accuracy or completeness of an item in their file — go to Section 611.
  • Section 612В – Not all credit reports are free, some may incur a fee — go to Section 612.
  • Section 613В – CRA’s must be careful about furnishing public records for employment reports — go to Section 613.
  • Section 614В – Talks about investigative consumer reports and using information from an old report — go to Section 614.
  • Section 615В – Users and others who obtain consumer reports have important responsibilities — go to Section 615.
  • Section 616В – Dollar liability for those who willfully violate the Act — go to Section 616.
  • Section 617В – Liability for those who are negligent in failing to comply with the Act — Section 617.
  • Section 618В – Bring actions in US district courts within a specified time frame — go to Section 618.
  • Section 619В – Fines and potential imprisonment for obtaining information under false pretenses — go to Section 619.
  • Section 620В – Fines and potential imprisonment for the officers and employees of the CRA — go to Section 620.
  • Section 621В – The Federal Trade Commission is the main enforcer of the Act — Section 621.
  • Section 622В – Requirements regarding the reporting of overdue child support — go to Section 622.
  • Section 623В – Companies that report your credit information have important responsibilities — Section 623.
  • Section 624В – Governs affiliates who may have access to the report for marketing etc. — go to Section 624.
  • Section 625В – Does not exempt state laws except to extent state law is inconsistent with this law — go to Section 625.
  • Section 626В – The FBI has special rights to see your file — go to Section 626.
  • Section 627В – Counterterrorism has special rights to see your file — go to Section 627.
  • Section 628В – Properly dispose of consumer information to protect the confidentiality of the information — go to Section 628.
  • Section 629В – Prevents consumer reporting agencies from circumventing the law — Section 629.
  • The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) is designed to help ensure that CRAs (Consumer Reporting Agencies, including credit bureaus and credit reporting companies) furnish correct and complete information to businesses to use when evaluating your application for credit, or insurance, or to employers or prospective employers.

    Your rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act include:

    • You have the right to receive a copy of your credit report. The copy of your report must contain all of the information in your file at the time of your request.
    • If you contest the completeness or accuracy of information in your report, you may file a dispute with the CRA and with the company that furnished the information to the CRA. Genrally both the CRA and the furnisher of information are legally obligated to reinvestigate your dispute as long as it is not frivolous.
    • CRA’s must correct or remove inaccurate, incomplete or unverifiable information in their files. CRA’s must remove obsolete information in their files.
    • If you are a victim of identity theft or are on active duty with the militar, you have more rights under the FCRA.
    • Only those with a permitted purpose or with your express permission may access your file.
    • Generally employers must have your express written permision to obtain your report.
    • Any company that denies your application, or takes an adverse action against you, based on information obtained from a CRA, must inform you of the adverse action and must supply you with the name and address of the CRA they used.
    • You have the right to a free copy of your credit report in numerous instances including when your application for credit or employment is adversely affected because of information supplied by the CRA. You can get a free credit report each year in any case.
    • You may opt-out of lists provided by the national credit bureaus that are based on your credit file.
    • You may sue under the FCRA for violations of the Act.
    • Credit scores are available to you on request from from mortgage credit agencies and sometimes from mortgage lenders. There may be a fee for the score.




    Here – s Why I Hate Credit Reporting Agencies, the three credit reporting agencies.#The #three #credit #reporting #agencies

    Here s Why I Hate Credit Reporting Agencies — And Why You Should Too

    A few days ago, Equifax, one of the Big Three credit reporting agencies, admitted that the personal data of 143 million consumers had been compromised. This is not the biggest data breach ever, but it might be the worst. After all, Equifax is not just any company. It s a company whose main job is collecting masses of private financial data—and it does this even though it has neither a business relationship nor explicit permission from the people it monitors. This is a massive and unprecedented FUBAR.

    (For more on why the Equifax breach is even worse than you think, Michael Hiltzik explains here.)

    The three credit reporting agencies

    I am no fan of the credit reporting business, one of the most arrogant and anti-consumer industries imaginable. Twelve years ago I wrote about them for the Washington Monthly, and it s startling how little has changed since then. I could republish the story today with only the most cursory changes.

    For example, part of my piece was devoted to credit freezes, something you may have heard a lot about lately. This is an action you can take to protect yourself in case of identify theft: if you ask for your account to be frozen, credit agencies will furnish a credit report only after they ve confirmed that it really is you who applied for credit. This stops identity thieves in their tracks: if they apply for a credit card in your name, the credit agency will call you first. When you tell them you never applied for the card, it doesn t get issued.

    But this really shouldn t be an option you have to request. It should be routine for all credit transactions. The reason it isn t is because it s inconvenient for the credit reporting agencies, who have fought regulation on this topic tooth and nail. It s also because they literally make money on identify theft—no, that s not a typo—and therefore don t have much incentive to do anything about it.

    Still, as much as I think all accounts should be frozen by default, my solution to the problem of identity theft isn t to force the credit reporting agencies to freeze or unfreeze accounts—or to force them to do anything else. It s to make them responsible for all damages related to identity theft and then let them figure out the best solution. Here s what I wrote in my Monthly piece:

    There is a successful precedent for this type of approach. In 1968, Congress passed the Truth in Lending Act, which imposed a variety of regulations on the lending industry. One notably simple provision was that consumers could be held liable for no more than $50 if their credit cards were stolen and used without their authorization. For anything above that, it was the credit-card issuer who had to pay. The result was predictable: Credit-card companies have since taken it upon themselves to develop a wide range ofeffective anti-fraud programs. Congress didn t tell them to do it, or even how. It just made them responsible for the losses, and the card issuers did the rest themselves.

    The same method should be used for identity theft. There s no need to create mountains of regulations, which are uniformly despised by the credit industry. Instead, simply make the industry itself—and any institution that handles personal data—liable for the losses in both time and money currently borne by consumers. The responsible parties will do the rest themselves.

    There s more to say about this, but sadly, my piece is no longer available at the Monthly site. The great linkrot plague has devoured it. Luckily, I m a magazine packrat and I still have a dead-tree copy. So I scanned it and turned it into a PDF. Click here to read it—and to find out just why I hate the credit reporting agencies so intensely. It s worth your time, especially considering how little has been done about this over the past decade. It represents one of the all-time abject surrenders to Big Finance, and it s something the Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party should be all over. The time for small-bore proposals is over. It s time to make the credit agencies—and others—pay for their flagrantly careless behavior. When they allow someone to steal your identity, they re the ones who should pay the price, not you.

    UPDATE: The Wayback Machine also has a copy of my article. I shoulda checked! Click here to see it.

    Get the scoop, straight from Mother Jones.
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    • The three credit reporting agencies





    Three Credit Bureaus Agencies, the three credit reporting agencies.#The #three #credit #reporting #agencies

    Information on the 3 National Credit Reporting Agencies or Credit Bureaus

    The 3 national credit reporting agencies in the United States are Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. Experian was formerly known as TRW. A fourth national credit reporting agency named Innovis exists, but does not currently seem to factor into decisions for denials of credit, insurance or employment. It is more in a development stage.

    To contact the 3 national credit reporting agencies:

    The three national credit agencies may be contacted directly at:

    Equifax

    TransUnion

    Experian

    Atlanta, GA 30374

    Chester, PA 19022

    These national credit agencies are for-profit companies owned by their shareholders. They are not government entities or funded by the government. There are also independent, non-national, local credit bureaus throughout the country that are generally affiliated with one of the 3 national credit reporting agencies. Local bureaus are sometimes for-profit companies and sometimes non-profit associations of lender/members in a particular geographical area.

    The 3 national credit reporting agencies are competitors of each other, and they do not normally share their credit information except in special cases. That is why it is important to order a credit report from all three.

    Credit agencies or bureaus gather their consumer credit information by soliciting creditors such as credit card companies, banks, and lenders to join their systems and contribute their credit experience on consumers to the systems. In return for submitting information to the systems, creditor members may use the system to obtain credit information on consumers to approve credit decisions or review existing consumer accounts.

    Credit agencies are generally regulated by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), which is the Federal law generally covering consumer reporting agencies including credit reporting in this country. Individual states may also have their own versions of the law.

    Under Federal law credit reporting companies known as CRAs (consumer reporting agencies) have numerous responsibilities to protect consumers and their credit information. A Summary of the FCRA is at http://www.creditreporting.com/fair-credit-reporting-act/index.html .

    Opt Out Number For List Sales by the National Credit Reporting Agencies

    IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT OF 1996.

    The credit reporting industry has designated a single toll free number that will allow consumers to opt out of promotional mailing lists sold by credit reporting agencies. The system is an interactive voice mail that requests information necessary to opt out of such lists.

    Consumers should call (888) 5 OPT OUT and follow the voice prompt. Once the information is recorded, an e-mail is sent to the three bureaus daily and posted to consumer files. The number is available 24 hours a day.





    Who Are the Three Major Credit Bureaus, the three credit reporting agencies.#The #three #credit #reporting #agencies

    Who Are the Three Major Credit Bureaus?

    The three credit reporting agencies

    Credit bureaus, also called credit reporting agencies, are companies that collect and maintain consumer credit information then resell it to other businesses in the form of a credit report.

    There are many credit bureaus in the United States, but most people are familiar with the big three: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. These bureaus are all publicly-traded, for-profit companies who are not owned by the government.

    The government does, however, have legislation, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, regarding how these and other credit bureaus should operate.

    Credit bureaus have business relationships with many banks, credit card issuers, and other businesses that you may have an account with. Because of this connection, your account history will appear on one or all three of your credit reports with these bureaus.

    You have a right to view your credit report and you can order a free credit report from each of the three major credit bureaus each year through AnnualCreditReport.com. You can also purchase a credit report directly from any of the credit bureaus at any time. Two of the credit bureaus, Equifax and Experian, offer 3-bureau credit reports which include all three major credit reports in a single document.

    You may also need to contact a credit bureau directly to dispute inaccurate information in your credit report, purchase a credit score, or to place a fraud alert or security freeze on your credit report.

    Otherwise, you generally wouldn t interact with a credit bureau, even though they play a major role in your financial life.

    Contact Information For the Three Credit Bureaus

    Atlanta, GA 30374-0241

    Allen, TX 75013-0949

    Chester, PA 19022

    What the Three Bureaus Do and Don t Do

    The major credit bureaus receive credit-related information from companies that you do business with. They may also pull relevant public records, like tax lien or bankruptcy, and include that information in your credit report.

    The major credit bureaus sell your credit information to businesses who have a legally valid need for viewing your credit information. Your information is also sold to companies who may prescreen you for their products and services. For example, a company who you ve applied for credit with would have a valid need for looking at your credit report.

    The major credit bureaus only provide the information or other analytical tools to help businesses make decisions about which customers to accept and the price they should charge. The bureaus themselves do not make the decision.

    Credit Bureau Differences

    These three credit bureaus, like all other credit bureaus, are separate entities and operate independently of each other. They generally do not share your account information with each other.

    Your creditors may report to all three of the major credit bureaus or just one of them.

    Because of that, the information in your credit file may be different between the three credit bureaus.

    When potential creditors and lenders check your credit, they may only pull one bureau s credit report, rather than viewing all three. (It s often less expensive for businesses to check just one credit report.)

    Because your credit reports may be different from each other, it s important that you review your reports from all three bureaus.

    FICO Is Not a Credit Bureau

    FICO is another major company in the credit industry. FICO developed and maintains the FICO credit score, but it is not a credit bureau. While they compile your credit score based on data from the major credit bureaus, they do not collect credit report data on their own.





    Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, what is the best credit card.#What #is #the #best #credit #card

    Credit Cards

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    Credit Cards – Compare Best Card Offers & Apply Online, Bankrate, what is the best credit card.#What #is #the #best #credit #card

    Compare partner credit card offers from our most

    Cash Back

    Balance Transfer

    Business Card

    Cards for Bad Credit

    What is the best credit card

    When looking to get a credit card, there are a variety of things you should consider. If you want a rewards card to use frequently, you might not mind paying a $100 or $200 annual fee. You should also consider the regular APR (as opposed to the introductory rate) and the interest rate. A good interest rate is dependent on how you will use the card. For example, a 20% interest rate is fine if you plan on paying off the balance every month.

    It pays to ask these kinds of questions before you fill out the application form. Here are 9 questions you want answered before you sign on the dotted line.

    The “very first question” the consumer should ask is, “Why am I applying for this card? Why do I need this card?” says Bruce McClary, media director for ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, a nonprofit affiliated with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling

    Some positive reasons: The card has low or no fees, a lower interest rate or offers a rewards program that suits your spending habits. “It has to make sense, and it has to fit into your overall lifestyle,” McClary says.

    Do you pay off your credit card balances every month? If so, “you don’t care what the interest rate is because you won’t pay any,” says Ric Edelman, author of “The Truth About Money.” “But you care about the (annual) fee,” he says.

    If you run a balance, you want the lowest rate you can get, even if that comes with an annual fee.

    One clue to your usage: “Look at your past history,” says Edelman. “Because what you’ve done before is what you will be doing.”

    If you’re shopping for a card, chances are you’re comparing card terms. But if an issuer sends you an offer, it’s tempting to apply and see what you get.

    “It’s really difficult to pick one (in isolation),” says Kelly Rogers, chief development officer for the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County and adjunct faculty at Chapman University. “If someone just shows you one car, how do you know if it’s the right car for you?”

    Her advice: Do a side-by-side comparison of several different cards before you apply.

    Don’t be afraid to plug the card name, “complaints” and “customer service” into your favorite search engine. “I go through and see who has the least amount of complaints and issues,” says Rogers.

    Some cards will give you a range of rates you could get, but often that window is pretty wide, says Nick Bourke, director of the Safe Credit Card Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Other cards may offer a specific rate (or terms) and either approve or reject you.

    If you’re operating totally in the dark, you have another option: Apply by phone and push for an answer on your rate and credit line before the account is opened.

    While there are no guarantees, sometimes you can get an answer, says Bourke.

    “I’ve actually done this myself,” he says, admitting “you do have to go pretty far in the process.”

    You may have to ask for the department that’s actually evaluating your application to get an answer, he says.

    “The thing that you want to do is when you’re talking to the person on the phone taking your application is you want to push them as hard as you can to get your APR and credit line,” Bourke says. Then, once you have the information and before the account is opened in your name, “you can say yes or no at that point,” he says.

    According to the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, if a card offers a lower interest rate during an introductory period, the promotional rate has to last at least six months. While that introductory offer may be appealing, the regular rate is what you’re really buying.

    So find out when the introductory APR expires and what the new rate will be. You can find this information online in the terms and conditions for the card or you can ask a service representative.

    Another smart question: How long is that grace period? “Some cards start charging interest immediately,” says Edelman. A card can have different grace periods for balance transfers and cash advances than it does for purchases.

    You can find information about the grace period in the credit card offer, thanks to federal rules that took effect in 2010. Look for a summary table of rate and fee disclosures, which will include a statement that explains how to avoid paying interest.

    If you’re getting the card for points or rewards, this is one you definitely need to ask, says Josh Frank, senior researcher with the Center for Responsible Lending. Some issuers will revoke rewards if you’re late with a payment by even one day, he says.

    “A lot of times, the answer they will give you is that they can take away or reduce your rewards for any reason,” he says. While that’s true, the issuer will have a policy on revoking or reducing points, and that’s what you want to ask about, he says. Under what specific circumstances would they reduce or eliminate a customer’s points?

    In most cases, “this is one the customer service agent should know the answer to,” he says.

    Some card issuers use your purchase records to assess your ongoing creditworthiness.

    That means if you suddenly use your card to purchase retread tires, pay for a session with a marriage counselor or make a purchase at a market on a sketchy side of town, you could see your APR climb or your credit limit fall, says Frank. If you see this practice as an invasion of privacy, ask beforehand if the issuer does this, he says.

    How to phrase it: Can my transactions ever be used in rating my credit risk?

    And that’s one question the customer service representative “might not know the answer to,” says Frank. “You might want to ask them to transfer you to the credit department manager.”

    If you are guaranteeing a card account by co-signing for a college student, ask if you will be on the hook for the debt after the other party turns 21, says Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center.

    Many times, “there is nothing to prevent the issuers from saying you’re going to be guaranteeing this card 15 years from now — long after junior is out of college,” she says.

    In addition, find out exactly what has to be done to get you off the account. Are you free to complete those steps yourself? Or will you need the cooperation of someone who might not want you — and those charging privileges — to go away?

    Federal regulations limit your liability for unauthorized credit card charges to $50 if you report it within two business days. The longer you wait, the more you may lose. Many issuers cap losses at zero dollars, provided you follow a few rules. So find out how the card would handle charges you didn’t make, says McClary.

    Also, does the issuer monitor usage and shut down the card if it sees out-of-the-ordinary charges or spending locations? That feature can be great if you always use the card for the same types of purchases in the same geographic area, but cumbersome if you’re getting the card for travel.

    While it sounds counterproductive, you want to ask some detailed questions on how the issuer will treat you if you run into financial problems, says McClary.

    Will you lose points or benefits? Will you be hit with late fees or a penalty rate? Ask what those penalties are or look online at the terms and conditions for the card.

    Some issuers have programs to slash interest temporarily for customers who get behind, he says. Others don’t. So find out ahead of time what kind of programs the issuer offers that will help you rehabilitate your account and restore your original terms, McClary says.

    Ask about the “worst case scenario,” he says. “When do they consider an account to be charged off? And when do they send an account to a collection agency?”

    “It may be a little tough to get a hold of that information because it might not be readily available at the customer service level,” says McClary. “You may have to punch it up a level.”





    Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, the best credit cards.#The #best #credit #cards

    Credit Cards

    Learn how the right credit card can become a power financial tool, from paying off debt faster to earning rewards and perks.

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    Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

    The best credit cards

    Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

    Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

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    Current Credit Card Interest Rates

    View current credit card rates based on Bankrate.com’s weekly national survey of large banks and thrifts.

    The best credit cards

    Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

    Your annual credit card spending will determine which of these rewards cards is right for you.

    The best credit cards

    Black Friday 2017: Find the best credit card strategy for you

    Using the right card can help you maximize rewards and save money while holiday shopping.

    The best credit cards

    6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

    There are ways you can prevent a card closing, but sometimes it’s out of your control.

    The best credit cards

    Uber’s new rewards credit card zooms ahead of the pack

    You may be floored by the souped-up rewards on dining and travel spending.

    The best credit cards

    Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

    The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

    The best credit cards

    Best credit card tips for November 2017

    These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

    RELATED TOPICS

    HELPFUL LINKS

    Maximize Your Money. Get Expert Advice Tools. Master Life’s Financial Journey.

    You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for four decades.

    Our tools, rates and advice help no matter where you are on life’s financial journey.

    How we make money

    Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.

    2017 Bankrate, LLC All Rights Reserved.





    California Housing Finance Agency, CalHFA, the best credit cards.#The #best #credit #cards

    CalHFA supports the needs of renters and homebuyers

    The best credit cards The best credit cards The best credit cards The best credit cards

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    CalHFA Homeowners

    The best credit cards

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    Lenders/Realtors

    The best credit cards

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    Multifamily Developers/Managers

    The best credit cards

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    What’s New at CalHFA

    • Program Bulletin #2017-13 – Proposed Federal Tax Reform and the Uncertainty of Mortgage Credit Certificate Program
    • Press Release 2017-11-09 – CalHFA Launches New Path to Homeownership for Service Members and Veterans
    • Video – Cal-EEM + Grant helps homebuyers with $24,000 of energy upgrades
    • Press Release 2017-10-03 – CalHFA Increases Access to Manufactured Home Loans
    • Program Bulletin #2017-12 – Closing Document Revisions for MyHome Assistance Program and Extra Credit Teacher Home Purchase Program (ECTP) when combined with a CalHFA Government Insured/Guaranteed First Mortgage
    • Program Bulletin #2017-11 – CalHFA Launches New CalHFA VA Loan Program
    • Press Release 2017-09-14 – Michael Carroll is CalHFA s New Director of Multifamily Programs
    • Program Bulletin #2017-10 – Updated Sales Price Limits
    • Program Bulletin #2017-09 – Updated Income Limits for all CalHFA Conventional and FHA Loan First Mortgage Programs
    • Program Bulletin #2017-08 – Updates to Manufactured Housing Guidelines for All CalHFA FHA Loan Programs
    • Press Release 2017-07-11 – CalHFA Helps Hundreds with Free Homebuyer Education
    • Program Bulletin #2017-07 – Escrow Holdbacks Allowed and Name Change for the Notice of Conditional Approval
    • Get to know CalHFA and our programs by viewing our Video Library.
    • Enews announcements can be found on our Archived Page.

    Hardship Foreclosure Assistance

    • Keep Your Home California programs are designed for homeowners who are struggling to pay their mortgages.

    The best credit cards

    • The Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) is available on loans owned by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. If these loans were insured by the California Housing Loan Insurance Fund they may be eligible to have existing mortgage insurance transferred to a new refinance loan.

    Other Information

    • The best credit cardsThe California Victims Compensation Board is available to help California victims of the October 1 shooting in Las Vegas. If you’ve lost a family member, been injured or attended the Route 91 Harvest Festival where this terrible tragedy occurred on Sunday night, CalVCB can provide financial assistance. Visit the California Victims Compensation Board website and news release for more information.
    • Public Notice: Environmental Assessment For Whittier Downey SE Apartments (300 MB)
    • Public Notice: Environmental Assessment For North San Pedro Studios
    • Public Notice: 2017 Mortgage Credit Certificate Program
    • Veterans Housing and Homelessness Prevention Program (VHHP)
    • 2014 California Affordable Housing Cost Study
    • Language Access Complaint Form /Formulario de queja de acceso por idioma

    The best credit cardsThe best credit cards

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    Credit Cards – Reviews, Advice & Calculators, the best credit card.#The #best #credit #card

    Credit Cards

    Learn how the right credit card can become a power financial tool, from paying off debt faster to earning rewards and perks.

    What would you like to do?

    Credit Card Offers

    Payoff Calculator

    Credit Card Reviews

    Minimum Payment Calculator

    Editor’s Picks

    The best credit card

    Why 0% financing from retailers can be a bad deal

    The best credit card

    Should you use a balance transfer credit card to pay down debt?

    The best credit card

    4 tips to maximize your rewards credit cards

    The best credit card

    6 risky ways to pay off credit card debt

    The best credit card

    What credit score do you need for a premium rewards credit card?

    Latest Articles

    The best credit card

    Business Platinum Card from American Express vs. Business Gold Rewards Card from American Express

    Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on the website are from companies from which this site receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this [. ]

    The best credit card

    U.S. Bank Cash+ Visa Signature Card vs. Chase Freedom

    Both cards offer bonus rewards in rotating quarterly categories.

    The best credit card

    Discover will search for your stolen data so you don’t have to

    Issuer will monitor the so-called dark web looking for your Social Security number.

    The best credit card

    Current Credit Card Interest Rates

    View current credit card rates based on Bankrate.com’s weekly national survey of large banks and thrifts.

    The best credit card

    Capital One VentureOne Rewards vs. Capital One Venture Rewards

    Your annual credit card spending will determine which of these rewards cards is right for you.

    The best credit card

    Black Friday 2017: Find the best credit card strategy for you

    Using the right card can help you maximize rewards and save money while holiday shopping.

    The best credit card

    6 reasons why an issuer may close your card

    There are ways you can prevent a card closing, but sometimes it’s out of your control.

    The best credit card

    Uber’s new rewards credit card zooms ahead of the pack

    You may be floored by the souped-up rewards on dining and travel spending.

    The best credit card

    Choosing the right credit cards as your family grows

    The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date. Please see the banks’ websites for the most current version of card offers. When you have a baby, your daily spending habits change almost [. ]

    The best credit card

    Best credit card tips for November 2017

    These four smart credit card moves can help you gobble up some savings.

    RELATED TOPICS

    HELPFUL LINKS

    Maximize Your Money. Get Expert Advice Tools. Master Life’s Financial Journey.

    You have money questions. Bankrate has answers. Our experts have been helping you master your money for four decades.

    Our tools, rates and advice help no matter where you are on life’s financial journey.

    How we make money

    Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.

    2017 Bankrate, LLC All Rights Reserved.





    Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), the fair credit reporting act.#The #fair #credit #reporting #act

    Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)

    Para informacion en espanol, visite www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore o escribe a la Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20552.

    A Summary of Your Rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act

    The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) promotes the accuracy, fairness, and privacy of information in the files of consumer reporting agencies. There are many types of consumer reporting agencies, including credit bureaus and specialty agencies (such as agencies that sell information about check writing histories, medical records, and rental history records). Here is a summary of your major rights under the FCRA. For more information, including information about additional rights, go to www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore or write to: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20552.

    You must be told if information in your file has been used against you. Anyone who uses a credit report or another type of consumer report to deny your application for credit, insurance, or employment or to take another adverse action against you must tell you, and must give you the name, address, and phone number of the agency that provided the information.

    You have the right to know what is in your file. You may request and obtain all the information about you in the files of a consumer reporting agency (your file disclosure ). You will be required to provide proper identification, which may include your Social Security number. In many cases, the disclosure will be free. You are entitled to a free file disclosure if:

    • a person has taken adverse action against you because of information in your credit report;
    • you are the victim of identity theft and place a fraud alert in your file;
    • your file contains inaccurate information as a result of fraud;
    • you are on public assistance;
    • you are unemployed but expect to apply for employment within 60 days.

    In addition, all consumers are entitled to one free disclosure every 12 months upon request from each nationwide credit bureau and from nationwide specialty consumer reporting agencies. See www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore for additional information.

    You have the right to ask for a credit score. Credit scores are numerical summaries of your creditworthiness based on information from credit bureaus. You may request a credit score from consumer reporting agencies that create scores or distribute scores used in residential real property loans, but you will have to pay for it. In some mortgage transactions, you will receive credit score information for free from the mortgage lender.

    You have the right to dispute incomplete or inaccurate information. If you identify information in your file that is incomplete or inaccurate, and report it to the consumer reporting agency, the agency must investigate unless your dispute is frivolous. See www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore for an explanation of dispute procedures.

    Consumer reporting agencies must correct or delete inaccurate, incomplete, or unverifiable information. Inaccurate, incomplete or unverifiable information must be removed or corrected, usually within 30 days. However, a consumer reporting agency may continue to report information it has verified as accurate.

    Consumer reporting agencies may not report outdated negative information. In most cases, a consumer reporting agency may not report negative information that is more than seven years old, or bankruptcies that are more than 10 years old.

    Access to your file is limited. A consumer reporting agency may provide information about you only to people with a valid need usually to consider an application with a creditor, insurer, employer, landlord, or other business. The FCRA specifies those with a valid need for access.

    You must give your consent for reports to be provided to employers. A consumer reporting agency may not give out information about you to your employer, or a potential employer, without your written consent given to the employer. Written consent generally is not required in the trucking industry. For more information, go to www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore.

    You may limit prescreened offers of credit and insurance you get based on information in your credit report. Unsolicited prescreened offers for credit and insurance must include a toll-free phone number you can call if you choose to remove your name and address from the lists these offers are based on. You may opt-out with the nationwide credit bureaus at 1 888 5OPTOUT (1 888 567 8688).

    You may seek damages from violators. If a consumer reporting agency, or, in some cases, a user of consumer reports or a furnisher of information to a consumer reporting agency violates the FCRA, you may be able to sue in state or federal court.

    Identity theft victims and active duty military personnel have additional rights. For more Information, visit www.consumerfinance.gov/learnmore.

    States may enforce the FCRA, and many states have their own consumer reporting laws. In some cases, you may have more rights under state law. For more information, contact your state or local consumer protection agency or your state Attorney General. For more information about your federal rights, contact:

    1.a. Banks, savings associations, and credit unions with total assets of over $10 billion and their affiliates.

    b. Such affiliates that are not banks, savings associations, or credit unions also should list in addition to the Bureau:

    a. Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection

    1700 G Street NW

    Washington, DC 20552

    b. Federal Trade Commission: Consumer Response Center – FCRA Washington, DC 20580

    2. To the extent not included in item 1 above:

    a. National banks, federal savings associations, and federal branches and federal agencies of foreign banks

    b. State member banks, branches and agencies of foreign banks (other than federal branches, federal agencies, and insured state branches of foreign banks), commercial lending companies owned or controlled by foreign banks, and organizations operating under section 25 or 25A of the Federal Reserve Act

    c. Nonmember Insured banks, Insured State Branches of Foreign Banks, and insured state savings associations

    a. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

    Customer Assistance Group

    1301 McKinney Street, Suite 3450

    Houston, TX 77010-9050

    b. Federal Reserve Consumer Help Center

    Minneapolis, MN 55480

    c. FDIC Consumer Response Center

    1100 Walnut Street, Box #11

    Kansas City, MO 64106

    d. National Credit Union Administration

    Office of Consumer Protection (OCP)

    Division of Consumer Compliance and Outreach (DCCO)

    1775 Duke Street

    Alexandria, VA 22314

    Asst. General Counsel for Aviation Enforcement Proceedings

    Aviation Consumer Protection Division

    Department of Transportation

    1200 New Jersey Avenue SE

    Washington, DC 20590

    4. Creditors Subject to Surface Transportation Board

    Office of Proceedings, Surface Transportation Board

    Department of Transportation

    395 E Street, SW

    Washington, DC 20423

    5. Creditors Subject to Packers and Stockyards Act

    Nearest Packers and Stockyards Administration area supervisor

    6. Small Business Investment Companies

    Associate Deputy Administrator for Capital Access

    United States Small Business Administration

    409 Third Street, SW, 8th Floor

    Washington, DC 20416

    Securities and Exchange Commission

    Washington, DC 20549

    8. Federal Land Banks, Federal Land Bank Associations, Federal Intermediate Credit Banks, and Production Credit Associations

    Farm Credit Administration

    1501 Farm Credit Drive

    McLean, VA 22102-5090

    9. Retailers, Finance Companies, and All Other Creditors Not Listed Above

    FTC Regional Office for region in which the creditor operates or Federal Trade Commission: Consumer Response Center FCRA

    Washington, DC 20580

    Notification of Rights

    Review Your Free Experian Credit Report Today

    Good credit begins with knowing where your credit is today. Get started with your free Experian Credit Report, updated every 30 days on sign in. No credit card required.

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    Powerful Plastic: The 10 Best Credit Cards of 2013 #how #to #get #credit #card #with #no #credit

    #the best credit cards
    #

    Powerful Plastic: The 10 Best Credit Cards of 2013

    Frequently covers crowdfunding, the sharing economy and social entrepreneurship.

    August 15, 2013

    A personal finance expert will always advise against running up a credit-card balance. But as a small-business owner trying to launch or grow your company, that may not always be a reality.

    If you do have to turn to plastic, be reminded that some cards are better than others. Credit-card comparison site CardRatings.com today released its list of the 10 best credit cards for 2013 thus far. The cards were chosen based on the quality of their customer service and their value for people with good to excellent credit.

    Credit-card issuers are having to work extra hard these days to win over consumers, many of whom are working to pay down debt, says CardRatings.com Editor-in-Chief Curtis Arnold. This puts consumers in the driver s seat and I would encourage folks, particularly those with good credit, to be very discriminating when shopping for a new card, he says in a statement.

    Here s a look at the full list:





    What is the best way to improve my credit score? #lease #a #car #with #bad #credit

    #my credit score
    #

    What is the best way to improve my credit score?

    While there is no best way to improve your credit score, as each of the three main credit reporting bureaus may give a higher value to one type of action over another, there are several steps you can take, which done together, can potentially raise your score 75 points or more. These steps are not difficult, but they do take planning and perseverance. You don’t necessary have to pay off all your debt, but rather you may need to reposition some debt, while paying down higher balances on other obligations. The reward is great, and can potentially save you thousands of dollars in lower-interest rate loans and time saving qualifying requirements. Most lenders base the interest rate they offer on the FICO score derived from the results found in the borrower’s credit report. The higher the FICO score, in most all cases, the better the interest rate offered. Although determining your FICO score may seem arbitrary and complicated, there are still things you can do to improve your over-all score.

      Obtain a free copy of your credit report from www.annualcreditreport.com. You can also call them at 877-322-8228 or write at Annual Credit Report Request Service, P.O. Box 105281, Atlanta, GA 30348-5281. If you have recently been denied credit, you have the right to request a free credit report from the bureau who reported your bad credit. Check and repair incorrect information. Look over the report carefully for errors or information which is outdated or not correct. Are there collections or past-due debts which have been paid off? If so, contact the creditor and ask that they send a correction to the credit reporting agencies. Are there items listed in which you perhaps were a co-signor on a credit card, for example with a parent or former spouse? Can these be removed? Are there items listed as open, yet you have closed out those accounts? Are any previous mortgages which have been paid noted as paid in full? Are there any late or delinquent payments which you can dispute? Are there any creditor items which you can write a letter of explanation to be attached to your credit report? If you failed to pay off an account and it went into collection, pay it off as soon as you can. These accounts hurt your score and remain on your report for seven years. Keep your balances low in relation to your credit limit. Do you have any credit cards in which the balance owing is close to the credit limit on the card? If so, try to pay down this balance. Try to limit the balance owing to no more than 40% – 50% of the credit limit. Make payments when due. Even if you carry roll over balances on a credit card, be sure to make that payment on or before the due date. Set up an automatic payment for at least the minimum payment. Your credit card company will send you a form to sign up for this feature. This will prevent you from ever being late on a payment. Delinquent payments, even if only a few days late can have a major negative impact on your FICO score. When possible, pay more than the minimum amount due. Even a payment of $20 or $20 over the minimum due will be helpful. Pay down any large credit balances. Paying down a balance is one of the fastest ways to improve your credit score. Can you tap into your savings to pay down or pay off a high interest or high balance card? This step can improve your credit score by up to 100 points by paying off some credit items completely and paying down the balance on others. When you pay off a credit card, don t necessarily close it down but rather keep a small balance so that your positive payment history will continue to show up on your credit report. Note that closing an account doesn’t make it go away. A closed account will still show up on your credit report, and may be considered by the score. Prevent numerous credit report searches. A credit search can be performed on your report without your knowledge. Chose to op-out by contacting (www.optoutprescreen.com ) and request that unauthorized persons not be allowed to access your credit report. Oftentimes repeated credit searches will lower your over-all FICO score. Your score is not affected when you check your own credit. Credit checks by prospective employers also do not count. These types of inquiries may appear on your credit report, but they are not included in your FICO score. Payoff or renegotiate bad credit debt. These could include such as medical collections, delinquent credit cards or past-due school fees. Work with the creditor and request a new pay-off figure which they will accept if you pay off the debt in full. If that is not possible, request a lower interest rate and realistic due date. Get any promise to remove bad credit in writing from the creditor. Only apply for credit cards which you absolutely need. Resist the temptation to take advantage of any offers for credit unless you are sure you need that extra credit. Opening new cards can lower your score and will result in additional credit searches showing up on your report.

    Copyright 2012 Sandy Gadow. All Rights Reserved. This article may not be resold, reprinted, resyndicated or redistributed without the written permission from Escrow Publishing Company.

    Related Question

    Can you give me an example of how a better FICO score will save me money?

    Lenders base their lending criteria on your FICO score. The higher the number, the easier it will be for you to obtain credit. Preferred borrowers with FICO scores of 720 and higher, may typically pay less in closing costs, and be allowed to provide less documentation than a borrower with a lower credit score. Certain requirements may be waived for the preferred borrower, such as prepayment penalties and required reserves or escrows held by the lender.

    For example, on a $300,000, fixed rate mortgage, for a 30 year term (rates may vary as to current market conditions):





    How to Put The Credit Bureaus on Fraud Alert #how #to #get #a #credit #card

    #three credit bureaus
    #

    How to Put The Credit Bureaus on Fraud Alert

    Fraud Alerts were initially established as a way for victims to flag their credit, and prevent more accounts being opened in a victim’s name. When a fraud alert is in place, a creditor establishing a new account has to confirm that the application is legitimate, usually by calling a telephone number that has been provided in the alert. The intention is to prevent “instant credit” from being provided without your approval. An initial fraud alert is temporary – 90 days – and is intended to give you a window of opportunity with which to check your credit report for signs of tampering and either confirm or rule out an identity theft incident. If you discover you are indeed a victim, the fraud alert can be extended up to seven years by making a written request and providing proof of the identity theft – such as your police report.

    Get started Start Your ID Theft Affidavit Answer a few questions. We’ll take care of the rest.

    To establish a fraud alert, you can call the toll-free number of one of the three credit bureaus and report that you suspect or know you have been a victim of ID theft. If you contact one bureau, they are obligated to notify the other two. However, it’s not a bad idea to contact all three, if only for your own peace of mind.

    Trans Union. 1-800-680-7289; www.transunion.com ; Fraud Victim Assistance Division, P.O. Box 6790, Fullerton, CA 92834-6790

    Equifax. 1-800-525-6285; www.equifax.com ; P.O. Box 740241, Atlanta, GA 30374-0241

    Experian. 1-888-EXPERIAN (397-3742); www.experian.com ; P.O. Box 9532, Allen, TX 75013

    You are entitled to a free copy of your credit report from each reporting bureau as soon as you have placed your fraud alert on file. You may also request to only have the last four digits of your social security number appear on your credit reports if you ask. Make sure that all the information listed on your credit reports is correct, and to follow up with companies of unexplained accounts, or accounts that have been tampered with to remove those inconsistencies. You may get faster results if you send your police Identity Theft Report with a cover letter when following up with your creditors.

    Get started Start Your ID Theft Affidavit Answer a few questions. We’ll take care of the rest.

    This article contains general legal information and does not contain legal advice. Rocket Lawyer is not a law firm or a substitute for an attorney or law firm. The law is complex and changes often. For legal advice, please ask a lawyer .





    How to improve your credit score: The facts and myths about credit ratings – Mirror Online #credit #report #annual

    #credit score uk
    #

    Get your credit rating sorted to improve your chances of borrowing

    Tough times mean banks are getting meaner and stricter about who they are prepared to lend to.

    It’s more vital than ever that you check your credit record, understand what affects your credit score and then get it as squeaky clean as possible. That will give you a fighting chance of getting that mortgage, loan or credit card – and at the very best rate.

    Lenders use credit reports to help them decide who to dole out cash to and at what price. You need to show you’re a safe bet or you’ll pay way over the odds in interest.

    There are lots of mistaken beliefs about how credit reports work and what affects them.

    Research by CreditExpert shows eight out of 10 of us believe that being unsuccessful with one lender will harm how others score you. While a ‘footprint’ of lenders’ searches is recorded, the fact that they declined you credit is not. But if you rapidly apply elsewhere, too many footprints will set alarm bells ringing that you are in financial difficulty.

    Around a quarter of people believe that missing a mortgage or credit card payment will not have an impact on their credit rating – but these are two of the biggest negative factors on a credit score.

    On the other hand, paying off a mortgage has a major positive effect – the bigger the amount of credit, the better repayments are for your rating. But the worse it will be if you miss one. The order of importance for things that affect your rating are: mortgage, followed by loan, credit card, store card, overdraft.

    Peter Turner, managing director at Experian Consumer Services, says: “Your credit report is used by lenders to gauge how well you manage credit, if you pose a creditworthiness risk, and it influences the rates you get.”

    By knowing what’s in your credit report you will see what potential lenders see and can take steps to improve how you are rated.

    Make improvements

    One way to improve your score is to take out a credit card and make regular repayments.

    UK customers with past debt problems or a limited credit history can get cards from Luma and Vanquis with rates well below payday loan levels.

    Vanquis charges an APR (annual percentage rate) of 39.9% and Luma 35.9%, with maximum credit limits of 1,000 and 1,500 respectively.

    Borrowing 400 at 39.9% will cost 13.55 interest for a month. With Wonga you’d pay 125.48 interest and fees at 4,214% APR.

    You need to build up a history of using the card and making payments on time EVERY month. Repay the balance each month to boost your score without paying any interest.

    For example, buy petrol on it once a month then pay off the bill in full.

    ‘I took out a card to buy a home’

    Dad Chris Reid got himself in debt when he was younger and has spent the past four years improving his chances of getting the mortgage he really wants to buy a family home.

    “Meeting my wife in 2008 kicked me into action to get my life back on track,” says Chris, 31, from Maidstone in Kent.

    “I saw an advert for CreditExpert and checked out my credit file. I had a score of just 320. I knew it wouldn’t be great but I was a bit shocked when I realised it was so low and I was in the bottom end of the very poor category.

    “I took out a high-interest credit card so I could try to rebuild my rating. It wasn’t to spend on everyday things, it was just for emergencies and to prove I was reliable and could make regular repayments.

    “I spent around 50 on it each month and paid the bill off in full. I know it’s been four years but my score has now reached 881, which is great as I’m well on my way to achieving that mortgage goal.

    “You have to stick with it. These things definitely don’t happen overnight. But, it has paid off for me. Even though I’m still paying off debts it feels good to be more in control of my finances. I don’t have to worry I will be turned down.

    “I’m feeling much more

    confident and thinking about changing my mobile phone con- tract and applying

    for a mainstream credit card.”

    Sign up and check your credit file at CreditExpert or Equifax – both offer a 30-day trial.

    5 steps to improve your credit score

    Make sure you are registered on the Electoral Roll at your current address. If you are not it can cause delays when you apply for credit, and some firms may turn you down flat if they can’t confirm where you live.

    Make sure all your credit report info is fully accurate and up to date. Dispute it if it’s not.

    If you have had previous credit problems and there were special circumstances such as losing your job, family bereavement etc, explain this on your report by adding a notice of correction to any late payments from this period.

    If you had financial links to other people which are no longer relevant (such as an ex-partner) ask for them to be removed from your records.

    Close accounts you no longer use. A lot of unused credit you can access without further checks may negatively affect your rating. It can also make you more vulnerable to fraud.

    Facts and myths about your credit score

    Here are the myths versus the reality about what will and won’t harm your credit rating:

    Myth: Being turned down for credit will harm your rating.

    Reality: Being turned down for credit is not held on a credit report so has no effect on how you’re rated. What does have an impact is if you’re unsuccessful and then repeatedly apply elsewhere without finding out what the problem is.

    Every search on your file that lenders make when they assess you leaves a footprint. Too many in too short a time can look like you’re in financial trouble, which makes you look like a risk.

    Myth: Regularly paying off utility bills will improve your score.

    Reality: You should, of course, always pay your utility bills. But not all utility companies share their information with credit reference agencies, so don’t assume that lenders will know that you’ve

    had a faultless history with your energy company.

    Myth: Working in a salaried job will improve your score.

    Reality: The fact that you have a job that pays a regular salary is not on your credit report. However, it will form part of a credit application and being employed and paid monthly is a sign of stability, which lenders like. They will also ask about your income to ensure that you can afford any new borrowing.

    Myth: Being arrested or having a criminal record will harm your rating.

    Reality: This sort of information is not on your credit file.

    Myth: Being on the electoral roll won’t improve how you’re rated for credit.

    Reality: This is one of the easiest ways to improve how you’re rated. It lets lenders corroborate your address and identity and is a sign

    of stability.

    Myth: Having several cards will harm how you’re rated.

    Reality: It comes down to how you use them. If you’re struggling to juggle payments, lenders will see this. But if you’re using less than 50% of your available balance, can afford payments and are making them on time, these are signs of someone who can sensibly manage their credit.

    It’s often better to have several cards with a lower balance on each than the same total amount all on one card. For example, if you had five cards with 1,000 credit available on each and each card was 100 in debit, but you transferred all the balances to one and cut up the others, it would probably have a negative impact. That said, some lenders may perceive a risk if your available balance is far, far more than you could ever afford to repay.

    Myth: Missing a credit card or mortgage payment won’t harm your score.

    Reality: Missing repayments is one of the most harmful things on your credit report. Lenders want to know you are reliable and not always making repayments says the opposite. Missing one or two may not make too much difference, but if it looks like regular behaviour, lenders will shy away.

    And remember that missed payments stay on your account for six years – so you could be storing up real problems for the future.

    Myth: Paying off a credit card on time has no impact on your rating.

    Reality: A strong history of regular payments and settling of accounts is exactly what lenders want to see.

    Myth: Having a credit card will harm your rating.

    Reality: If you don’t use credit, lenders find it hard to assess whether you would be a good person to lend to. Remember, they are looking for evidence that you are a safe bet.





    Your Credit Score: How to Improve the 3-Digit Number That Shapes Your Financial Future (4th Edition) (Liz Pulliam Weston) #loans #for #poor #credit

    #which credit report is best
    #

    Description

    From the Back Cover

    Wall Street Journal Online

    “A great credit score can help you finish rich! Liz Weston gives solid, easy-to-understand advice about how to improve your credit fast. Read this book and prosper.”

    David Bach. bestselling author of The Automatic Millionaire and The Automatic Millionaire Homeowner

    “Excellent book! Insightful, well written, and surprisingly interesting. Liz Weston has done an outstanding job demystifying an often intimidating and frustrating topic for the benefit of all consumers.”

    Eric Tyson. syndicated columnist and bestselling author of Personal Finance for Dummies

    “No one makes complex financial information easy to understand like Liz Weston. Her straight-talk and wise advice are invaluable to anyone with a credit card or checkbook–and that’s just about all of us.”

    Lois P. Frankel, Ph.D.. author of Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office and Nice Girls Don’t Get Rich

    “In a country where consumers increasingly pay more when they have bad credit, Liz Weston’s book provides excellent tips and advice on ways to improve your credit history and raise your credit score. If you just apply one or two of her insightful suggestions, you’ll save many times the cost of this book.”

    Ilyce R. Glink. financial reporter, talk show host, and bestselling author of 100 Questions Every First-Time Home Buyer Should Ask

    “Your credit score can save you money or cost you money–sometimes a lot of money. Yet, most people don’t even know their scores, much less know how to make them better. Liz Weston can help you fix that. In this easy-to-understand guide, you’ll learn how to make sure your score helps you get the best deal on loans and insurance. You can’t afford not to read it.”

    Gerri Detweiler. consumer advocate and founder of UltimateCredit.com

    America’s Most Trusted Guide to Improving Your Credit Score.

    Now Completely Updated!

    • Boosting your score: what works now, what doesn’t–and what you should never do!

    • Detailed new charts: How short sales, foreclosures, and missed payments impact your score

    • Must-have information about credit score abuse–and how to fight back

    • By award-winning MSN Money/AARP financial columnist and public radio contributor Liz Weston

    Your credit score is more important than ever: not just for getting loans, but for getting jobs, insurance, rentals, and fair rates on all financial services. Now, more than ever, you need America’s #1 guide to credit scores: Your Credit Score. by MSN and AARP columnist Liz Weston.

    Accurate, expert, and proven, this book tells you the truth–and it’s already helped many thousands of people take control of their credit scores. Now, it’s completely revamped for today’s massive changes–from FICO 8 to “FAKO,” short sales to employer abuse of credit scores.

    Whatever your score, you need this information–to defend yourself, and to get the credit, rates, work, and home you deserve!

    Product Description

    Today, a good credit score is essential for getting decent terms on credit–or for getting credit at all. But that’s just the beginning: Your credit score rating can be reviewed by everyone from employers to cell phone carriers. Now, MSNBC/L.A. Times journalist Liz Weston has thoroughly updated her best-selling guide to credit scores, with crucial new information for protecting (or rebuilding) yours. Your Credit Score, Fourth Edition thoroughly covers brand-new laws changing everything from how your credit score can be used to how you can communicate with collectors. This edition also adds simple graphics revealing exactly how much skipped payments, bankruptcies, and other actions will lower your credit ratings, and how long it takes to rebound. You’ll find new information on FAKO alternative scores, expanded coverage of short sales, foreclosures, the new FICO 8 Mortgage Score, and when to walk away from a mortgage. Learn how to protect yourself against new credit risks from social networking and mobile banking and how to safeguard against unethical or illegal use of credit scores by employers. Weston updates her expert guidance on using FICO 08 to raise your score, fighting lower limits and higher rates, maintaining the right mix of cards and balances, bouncing back from bad credit, choosing credit solutions that help, not hurt… and much more!

    About the Author

    Liz Weston is a personal finance columnist whose twice-weekly columns for MSN Money reach more than 10 million people each month. She writes a money column, “My Two Cents,” for AARP the Magazine. the largest circulation magazine in the world with 22 million subscribers, and authors the question-and-answer column “Money Talk,” which appears in the Los Angeles Times and other newspapers throughout the country.

    Liz is a regular commentator on American Public Media’s Marketplace Money and has contributed to NPR’s “Talk of the Nation” and “All Things Considered.” She has appeared on Dr. Phil. Today Show. and NBC Nightly News. and was for several years a weekly commentator on CNBC’s Power Lunch .

    Her advice on credit and finance has been featured in Consumer Reports. Marie Claire. Parents. Real Simple. Woman’s World. Woman’s Day. Good Housekeeping. Family Circle. and many other publications.

    Formerly a personal finance writer for the Los Angeles Times. Weston has won numerous reporting awards, including the 2010 Betty Furness Consumer Media Award by the Consumer Federation of America, designed to honor individuals who have made “exceptional progress in American consumerism.”

    Her other books include The 10 Commandments of Money. which the New York Times praised as “a wonderful basic personal finance book…[with] enough counterintuitive ideas to keep even people who know a bit about personal finance reading further.” She is also the author of Deal with Your Debt and Easy Money. both published by Pearson.

    Weston is a graduate of the certified financial planner training program at University of California, Irvine. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and daughter. She can be reached via the “Contact Liz” form on her Web site, AskLizWeston.com.